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The areas of the world that at one time were territories of the Spanish Monarchy or Empire.
The areas of the world that at one time were territories of the Spanish Monarchy or Empire.
  Portuguese Empire during the Iberian Union (1581–1640).
  Territories held before the Treaties of UtrechtBaden (1713–1714).
  Territories held before the Spanish American wars of independence (1808–1833).
  Territories held before the Spanish–American War (1898–1899).
  Territories granted independence during the Decolonisation of Africa (1956–1976).
  Current territories administered by Spain.

The Spanish Empire (Spanish: Imperio español{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}) was one of the largest empires in world history and one of the first of global extent. It reached the peak of its military, political and economic power under the Spanish Habsburgs<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> through the 16th and 17th centuries, and its greatest territorial extent under the Bourbons in the 18th century when it was the largest empire in the world. The Spanish Empire became the foremost global power of its time, and was the first to be called the empire on which the sun never sets. The empire, administered from Madrid by the Spanish Crown, comprised territories and colonies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania. It originated during the Age of Exploration after the voyages of Christopher Columbus and lasted until the late 19th century. Spain's territorial reach beyond Europe included the Greater Antilles, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States), as well as a number of Pacific Ocean archipelagos including the Philippines.

The bulk of Spain's Empire was held for over three centuries, starting in 1492 with the Spanish colonization of the Americas and lasting until the early 19th century Spanish American wars of independence that left only Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines as Spanish. Following the Spanish–American War of 1898, Spain ceded its last colonies in the Caribbean and the Pacific to the United States. Its last African colonies were granted independence in 1975. In conjunction with the territories of the Portuguese Empire, which Spain controlled from 1580 to 1640, the Spanish Empire started the European dominance in global affairs.

The Spanish Empire has left a huge cultural, urban and architectural legacy in the Western Hemisphere. Hundreds of towns and cities in the Americas were founded during the Spanish period. The tangible heritage includes forts, churches, schools, hospitals, government buildings and colonial residences, many of which still stand today. Many present-day roads, canals, ports or bridges sit where Spanish engineers built them centuries ago. The oldest universities in the Americas were founded by Spanish scholars and Catholic missionaries. The Spanish Empire also left a vast cultural and linguistic legacy. With over 470 million native speakers today, Spanish is the second most spoken native language in the world, as result of the introduction of the language of Castile—Castilian, "Castellano" —from Iberia to Spanish America, later expanded by the governments of the independent republics. Other cultural legacies of the Spanish empire overseas was Roman Catholicism, which remains today the main religion in Spanish America. The cultural legacy is also present in the music, architecture, cuisine and fashion of much of Spanish America.


Spanish Empire sections
Intro   Definition    Origins    The Spanish Habsburgs: The Sun Never Sets (1516\u20131700)    The New World    The Spanish Empire: reform and recovery (1700\u20131808)    Twilight of the Global Empire (1800\u201399)    Territories in Africa (1885\u20131975)    Legacy    References    External links   

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

{{safesubst:#invoke:Separated entries|br}}
Flag
The areas of the world that at one time were territories of the Spanish Monarchy or Empire.
The areas of the world that at one time were territories of the Spanish Monarchy or Empire.
  Portuguese Empire during the Iberian Union (1581–1640).
  Territories held before the Treaties of UtrechtBaden (1713–1714).
  Territories held before the Spanish American wars of independence (1808–1833).
  Territories held before the Spanish–American War (1898–1899).
  Territories granted independence during the Decolonisation of Africa (1956–1976).
  Current territories administered by Spain.

The Spanish Empire (Spanish: Imperio español{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}) was one of the largest empires in world history and one of the first of global extent. It reached the peak of its military, political and economic power under the Spanish Habsburgs<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> through the 16th and 17th centuries, and its greatest territorial extent under the Bourbons in the 18th century when it was the largest empire in the world. The Spanish Empire became the foremost global power of its time, and was the first to be called the empire on which the sun never sets. The empire, administered from Madrid by the Spanish Crown, comprised territories and colonies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania. It originated during the Age of Exploration after the voyages of Christopher Columbus and lasted until the late 19th century. Spain's territorial reach beyond Europe included the Greater Antilles, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States), as well as a number of Pacific Ocean archipelagos including the Philippines.

The bulk of Spain's Empire was held for over three centuries, starting in 1492 with the Spanish colonization of the Americas and lasting until the early 19th century Spanish American wars of independence that left only Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines as Spanish. Following the Spanish–American War of 1898, Spain ceded its last colonies in the Caribbean and the Pacific to the United States. Its last African colonies were granted independence in 1975. In conjunction with the territories of the Portuguese Empire, which Spain controlled from 1580 to 1640, the Spanish Empire started the European dominance in global affairs.

The Spanish Empire has left a huge cultural, urban and architectural legacy in the Western Hemisphere. Hundreds of towns and cities in the Americas were founded during the Spanish period. The tangible heritage includes forts, churches, schools, hospitals, government buildings and colonial residences, many of which still stand today. Many present-day roads, canals, ports or bridges sit where Spanish engineers built them centuries ago. The oldest universities in the Americas were founded by Spanish scholars and Catholic missionaries. The Spanish Empire also left a vast cultural and linguistic legacy. With over 470 million native speakers today, Spanish is the second most spoken native language in the world, as result of the introduction of the language of Castile—Castilian, "Castellano" —from Iberia to Spanish America, later expanded by the governments of the independent republics. Other cultural legacies of the Spanish empire overseas was Roman Catholicism, which remains today the main religion in Spanish America. The cultural legacy is also present in the music, architecture, cuisine and fashion of much of Spanish America.


Spanish Empire sections
Intro   Definition    Origins    The Spanish Habsburgs: The Sun Never Sets (1516\u20131700)    The New World    The Spanish Empire: reform and recovery (1700\u20131808)    Twilight of the Global Empire (1800\u201399)    Territories in Africa (1885\u20131975)    Legacy    References    External links   

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