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Vitis rotundifolia, or muscadine,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> is a grapevine species native to the southeastern and south-central United States from Florida to Delaware, west to eastern Texas and Oklahoma.<ref>Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map</ref> It has been extensively cultivated since the 16th century.<ref name=plants>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The plants are well adapted to their native warm and humid climate; they need fewer chilling hours than better known varieties and they thrive on summer heat.

Muscadine berries range from bronze to dark purple to black in color when ripe.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> However, many wild varieties stay green through maturity. They have skin sufficiently tough that eating the raw fruit often involves biting a small hole in the skin to suck out the pulp inside. Muscadines are not only eaten fresh, but also are used in making wine, juice, and jelly.

Muscadine grapes are rich sources of polyphenols and other nutrients studied for their potential health benefits. Gallic acid, (+)-catechin and epicatechin are the major phenolics in seeds, while ellagic acid, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, and trans-resveratrol are the major phenolics in the skins.<ref name="Pastrana-Bonilla2003">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

In a natural setting, muscadines are important plants for improving wildlife habitat by providing cover, browse, and fruit for a wide variety of animals.<ref>Williams, Rick and Tim Baxley. Managing Native Vegetation for Wildlife. University of Florida IFAS Extension.</ref>


Vitis rotundifolia sections
Intro  Taxonomy  Cultivars  Wine  Other products  Resveratrol and other polyphenols  Other nutrients  Potential medicinal uses  Anti-cancer evidence  Nutritional Information  References  External links  

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Grapes::grape    State::vitis    Journal::title    Category::ellagic    Species::other    Content::florida

{{#invoke:Italic title|main}}

Vitis rotundifolia, or muscadine,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> is a grapevine species native to the southeastern and south-central United States from Florida to Delaware, west to eastern Texas and Oklahoma.<ref>Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map</ref> It has been extensively cultivated since the 16th century.<ref name=plants>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The plants are well adapted to their native warm and humid climate; they need fewer chilling hours than better known varieties and they thrive on summer heat.

Muscadine berries range from bronze to dark purple to black in color when ripe.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> However, many wild varieties stay green through maturity. They have skin sufficiently tough that eating the raw fruit often involves biting a small hole in the skin to suck out the pulp inside. Muscadines are not only eaten fresh, but also are used in making wine, juice, and jelly.

Muscadine grapes are rich sources of polyphenols and other nutrients studied for their potential health benefits. Gallic acid, (+)-catechin and epicatechin are the major phenolics in seeds, while ellagic acid, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, and trans-resveratrol are the major phenolics in the skins.<ref name="Pastrana-Bonilla2003">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

In a natural setting, muscadines are important plants for improving wildlife habitat by providing cover, browse, and fruit for a wide variety of animals.<ref>Williams, Rick and Tim Baxley. Managing Native Vegetation for Wildlife. University of Florida IFAS Extension.</ref>


Vitis rotundifolia sections
Intro  Taxonomy  Cultivars  Wine  Other products  Resveratrol and other polyphenols  Other nutrients  Potential medicinal uses  Anti-cancer evidence  Nutritional Information  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Taxonomy
<<>>