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Offensiveness::Fuck

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Title::''fuck''    First::english    Language::author    Which::words    Usage::sexual    Example::common

Offensiveness The word's use is considered obscene, but is common in many informal and familiar situations. It is unclear whether the word has always been considered vulgar, and, if not, when it first came to be used to describe (often in an extremely angry, hostile or belligerent manner) unpleasant circumstances or people in an intentionally offensive way, such as in the term motherfucker, one of its more common usages in some parts of the English-speaking world. Some English-speaking countries censor it on television and radio. Andrea Millwood Hargrave's 2000 study of the attitudes of the British public found that fuck was considered the third most severe profanity and its derivative motherfucker second. Cunt was considered the most severe.<ref name="Hargrave">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Nevertheless, the word has become increasingly less vulgar and more publicly acceptable, an example of the "dysphemism treadmill", wherein former vulgarities become inoffensive and commonplace.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="Christian">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> However, lawyer and linguist professor Pamela Hobbs,<ref name=Hobbs_CV>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> has stated that, "notwithstanding its increasing public use, enduring cultural models that inform our beliefs about the nature of sexuality and sexual acts preserve its status as a vile utterance that continues to inspire moral outrage." Hobbs considers users rather than usage of the word and sub-divides users into: 'non-users', for whom the word "evokes the core sexual meanings and associated sexual imagery that motivate the taboo", and 'users' for whom "metaphorical uses of the word fuck no more evoke images of sexual intercourse than does a ten-year-old’s ‘My mom’ll kill me if she finds out’ evoke images of murder," where the "criteria of taboo are missing."<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }} Pdf.</ref> The word was included for the first time as one of three vulgarities in The Canadian Press's Canadian Press Caps and Spelling guide in 2005 because of its increasing usage in the public forum. Journalists were advised to refrain from censoring the word but use it sparingly and only when its inclusion was essential to the story.<ref name="CPmanual">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


Fuck sections
Intro  Offensiveness  Etymology  Grammar  Early usage  Rise of modern usage  Modern usage  Censorship  Common alternatives  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

Offensiveness
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