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In ancient Greek religion and Greek mythology, Demeter ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Attic: Δημήτηρ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} Dēmḗtēr; Doric: Δαμάτηρ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} Dāmā́tēr) is the goddess of the harvest, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth. Her cult titles include Sito (Σιτώ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}), "she of the Grain",<ref>. Cf. .</ref> as the giver of food or grain<ref>Eustathius of Thessalonica, scholia on Homer, 265.</ref> and Thesmophoros (θεσμός{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, thesmos: divine order, unwritten law; "phoros": bringer, bearer), "Law-Bringer," as a mark of the civilized existence of agricultural society.<ref name=Finley78>Themis was an ancient Greek goddess, embodiment of divine order, law. She was the organizer of the communal affairs and she evoked the social order: Finley, The World of Odysseus, rev. ed. Viking Press. (1978:78 note 82)</ref>

Though Demeter is often described simply as the goddess of the harvest, she presided also over the sacred law, and the cycle of life and death. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries that predated the Olympian pantheon. In the Linear B Mycenean Greek tablets of circa 1400–1200 BC found at Pylos, the "two mistresses and the king" may be related with Demeter, Persephone and Poseidon.<ref>John Chadwick, The Mycenean World. Cambridge University Press, 1976.</ref><ref name=Mylonas159>"Wa-na-ssoi, wa-na-ka-te, (to the two queens and the king). Wanax is best suited to Poseidon, the special divinity of Pylos. The identity of the two divinities addressed as wanassoi, is uncertain ": George Mylonas (1966) Mycenae and the Mycenean age" p.159 :Princeton University Press</ref> Her Roman equivalent is Ceres.<ref name=Lar>Larousse Desk Reference Encyclopedia, The Book People, Haydock, 1995, p. 215.</ref>


Demeter sections
Intro   Etymology    Agricultural deity    Festivals and cults   Myths   Titles and functions    Cult places   Genealogy of the Olympians in Greek mythology   Consorts and children    Portrayals    See also    Notes    References    External links   

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