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The Central Treaty Organization (CENTO), originally known as the Baghdad Pact or the Middle East Treaty Organization (METO) was formed in 1955 by Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. It was dissolved in 1979.

U.S. pressure and promises of military and economic aid were key in the negotiations leading to the agreement, although the United States could not initially participate. John Foster Dulles, who was involved in the negotiations, ascribed this to "the pro-Israel lobby and the difficulty of obtaining Congressional Approval."<ref>Selwyn Lloyd; Suez 1956: A Personal account</ref> Others said the reason was "for purely technical reasons of budgeting procedures."<ref>Hadley, Guy. CENTO: The Forgotten Alliance ISIO Monographs, University of Sussex, UK (1971): 2.</ref> In 1958, the United States joined the military committee of the alliance. It is generally viewed as one of the least successful of the Cold War alliances.<ref></ref> The organization's headquarters were located in Baghdad (Iraq) in 1955–1958 and in Ankara (Turkey) in 1958–1979. Cyprus was also an important location for CENTO due to its positioning within the Middle East and the British Sovereign Base Areas situated on the island.<ref>Dimitrakis, Panagiotis, "The Value to CENTO of UK Bases on Cyprus", Middle Eastern Studies, Volume 45, Issue 4, July 2009, pp 611–624</ref>


Central Treaty Organization sections
Intro  History  Timeline  Secretaries General  CENTO railway  Cultural and Research Institutions  See also  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Central Treaty Organization (CENTO), originally known as the Baghdad Pact or the Middle East Treaty Organization (METO) was formed in 1955 by Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. It was dissolved in 1979.

U.S. pressure and promises of military and economic aid were key in the negotiations leading to the agreement, although the United States could not initially participate. John Foster Dulles, who was involved in the negotiations, ascribed this to "the pro-Israel lobby and the difficulty of obtaining Congressional Approval."<ref>Selwyn Lloyd; Suez 1956: A Personal account</ref> Others said the reason was "for purely technical reasons of budgeting procedures."<ref>Hadley, Guy. CENTO: The Forgotten Alliance ISIO Monographs, University of Sussex, UK (1971): 2.</ref> In 1958, the United States joined the military committee of the alliance. It is generally viewed as one of the least successful of the Cold War alliances.<ref></ref> The organization's headquarters were located in Baghdad (Iraq) in 1955–1958 and in Ankara (Turkey) in 1958–1979. Cyprus was also an important location for CENTO due to its positioning within the Middle East and the British Sovereign Base Areas situated on the island.<ref>Dimitrakis, Panagiotis, "The Value to CENTO of UK Bases on Cyprus", Middle Eastern Studies, Volume 45, Issue 4, July 2009, pp 611–624</ref>


Central Treaty Organization sections
Intro  History  Timeline  Secretaries General  CENTO railway  Cultural and Research Institutions  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History
<<>>