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{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no". Formally, they present an exclusive disjunction, a pair of alternatives of which only one is acceptable. In English, such questions can be formed in both positive and negative forms (e.g. "Will you be here tomorrow?" and "Won't you be here tomorrow?").<ref name=Grimes>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

Yes–no questions are in contrast with non-polar wh-questions, with the five Ws, which do not necessarily present a range of alternative answers, or necessarily restrict that range to two alternatives. (Questions beginning with "which", for example, often presuppose a set of several alternatives, from which one is to be drawn.)<ref name=Grimes />


Yes–no question sections
Intro   How such questions are posed   Ambiguities   How such questions are answered    Suggestibility    See also    References    Further reading   

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{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no". Formally, they present an exclusive disjunction, a pair of alternatives of which only one is acceptable. In English, such questions can be formed in both positive and negative forms (e.g. "Will you be here tomorrow?" and "Won't you be here tomorrow?").<ref name=Grimes>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

Yes–no questions are in contrast with non-polar wh-questions, with the five Ws, which do not necessarily present a range of alternative answers, or necessarily restrict that range to two alternatives. (Questions beginning with "which", for example, often presuppose a set of several alternatives, from which one is to be drawn.)<ref name=Grimes />


Yes–no question sections
Intro   How such questions are posed   Ambiguities   How such questions are answered    Suggestibility    See also    References    Further reading   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: How such questions are posed
<<>>