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Flagpoles and flags of the World Taekwondo Foundation and of the Korean Taekwondo Association at the Kukkiwon in Seoul, South Korea

The World Taekwondo Federation (WTF) is the international federation governing the sport of taekwondo and is a member of the Association of Summer Olympic International Federations (ASOIF).<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The WTF was established on May 28, 1973 at its inaugural meeting held at the Kukkiwon with participation of 35 representatives from around the world. There are now 205 member nations. Since 2004, Choue Chung-won has been the president of the WTF, succeeding the first president, Kim Un-yong, after he retired. On July 17, 1980 the International Olympic Committee recognized the WTF at its 83rd Session in Moscow, Soviet Union. First, Taekwondo was adopted as a demonstration sport of the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea; later, on September 4, 1994 Taekwondo was adopted as an official Sport of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games at the 103rd IOC Session in Paris, France. According to the WTF, "Taekwondo is one of the most systematic and scientific Korean traditional martial arts, that teaches more than physical fighting skills. It is a discipline that shows ways of enhancing our spirit and life through training our body and mind. Today, it has become a global sport that has gained an international reputation, and stands among the official games in the Olympics."<ref name="WTF intro">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


World Taekwondo Federation sections
Intro   Organizational structure    History    Mission and objectives    Membership    WTF Promoted Championships    Rules and regulations   See also  References  External links  

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