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Winter::winter    January::december    Thumb::northern    Title::february    Winters::climate    Solstice::weather

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A snow-covered park in front of the Cathedral of Learning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania during winter

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Winter is the coldest season of the year in polar and temperate climates, between autumn and spring. Winter is caused by the axis of the Earth in that hemisphere being oriented away from the Sun. Different cultures define different dates as the start of winter, and some use a definition based on weather. When it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere, and vice versa. In many regions, winter is associated with snow and freezing temperatures. The moment of winter solstice is when the sun's elevation with respect to the North or South Pole is at its most negative value (that is, the sun is at its farthest below the horizon as measured from the pole). The earliest sunset and latest sunrise dates outside the polar regions differ from the date of the winter solstice, however, and these depend on latitude, due to the variation in the solar day throughout the year caused by the Earth's elliptical orbit (see earliest and latest sunrise and sunset).


Winter sections
Intro  Etymology  Cause  Meteorological reckoning  Astronomical and other calendar-based reckoning  Ecological reckoning and activity  Exceptionally cold winters  Other historically significant winters  Humans and winter  Festivals  Mythology  See also  References  Further reading   External links   

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