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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use British English |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

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Bronze Yard №11, the official standard of length for the United States between 1855 and 1892, when the Treasury Department formally adopted a metric standard. Bronze Yard №11 was forged to be an exact copy of the British Imperial Standard Yard, which was ruined in 1834 during the Burning of Parliament. Both were line standards: the yard was defined by the distance at 62°F between two fine lines drawn on gold plugs (closeup, top) installed in recesses near each end of the bar.
A helium–neon laser at the Kastler-Brossel Laboratory at Univ. Paris 6. Britain's metric and imperial units of length and volume are now all ultimately derived from measurements of the speed of light in a vacuum.
Britain's units of mass are derived from national standards periodically reverified against the platinum & iridium International Prototype Kilogram stored beneath two bell jars in a basement vault at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures's headquarters at Pavillon de Breteuil in Paris. A display replica shown at Paris's Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie shown here.

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} Weights and measures acts are acts of the British Parliament determining the regulation of weights and measures. It also refers to similar royal and parliamentary acts of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland and the medieval Welsh states. The earliest of these were originally untitled but were given descriptive glosses or titles based upon the monarch under whose reign they were promulgated. Several omnibus modern acts are entitled the Weights and Measures Act and are distinguished by the year of their enactment.

There have been many laws concerned with weights and measures in the United Kingdom or parts of it over the last 1000 or so years. The acts may catalogue lawful weights and measures, prescribe the mechanism for inspection and enforcement of the use of such weights and measures and may set out circumstances under which they may be amended. Modern legislation may, in addition to specific requirements, set out circumstances under which the incumbent minister may amend the legislation by means of statutory instruments. Prior to the Weights and Measures Act of 1985, weights and measures acts were only concerned with trade law where the weight or size of the goods being traded was important. The 1985 act, however, had a broader scope, encompassing all aspects covered by the European Economic Community (EEC) European Commission directive 80/181/EEC.

As of 25 April 2012, the current primary legislation in the United Kingdom is the 1985 Act, which was last amended by statutory instrument in 2011.<ref name=1985Act> {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref> Statutory instruments made under the authority of the Act do not amend the Act per se{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, but regulate particular areas covered by the Act.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref>

The Act is currently enforced by the 200 Trading Standards Offices managed by local authorities around the country. Definitions of units of measurements and the technical equipment relating to weights and measures are provided by the National Measurement Office, an agency of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.


Weights and Measures Acts (UK) sections
Intro  Permitted units of measure  England  Great Britain  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Permitted units of measure
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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use British English |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

bracket_year_right = ) }}
Bronze Yard №11, the official standard of length for the United States between 1855 and 1892, when the Treasury Department formally adopted a metric standard. Bronze Yard №11 was forged to be an exact copy of the British Imperial Standard Yard, which was ruined in 1834 during the Burning of Parliament. Both were line standards: the yard was defined by the distance at 62°F between two fine lines drawn on gold plugs (closeup, top) installed in recesses near each end of the bar.
A helium–neon laser at the Kastler-Brossel Laboratory at Univ. Paris 6. Britain's metric and imperial units of length and volume are now all ultimately derived from measurements of the speed of light in a vacuum.
Britain's units of mass are derived from national standards periodically reverified against the platinum & iridium International Prototype Kilogram stored beneath two bell jars in a basement vault at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures's headquarters at Pavillon de Breteuil in Paris. A display replica shown at Paris's Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie shown here.

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} Weights and measures acts are acts of the British Parliament determining the regulation of weights and measures. It also refers to similar royal and parliamentary acts of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland and the medieval Welsh states. The earliest of these were originally untitled but were given descriptive glosses or titles based upon the monarch under whose reign they were promulgated. Several omnibus modern acts are entitled the Weights and Measures Act and are distinguished by the year of their enactment.

There have been many laws concerned with weights and measures in the United Kingdom or parts of it over the last 1000 or so years. The acts may catalogue lawful weights and measures, prescribe the mechanism for inspection and enforcement of the use of such weights and measures and may set out circumstances under which they may be amended. Modern legislation may, in addition to specific requirements, set out circumstances under which the incumbent minister may amend the legislation by means of statutory instruments. Prior to the Weights and Measures Act of 1985, weights and measures acts were only concerned with trade law where the weight or size of the goods being traded was important. The 1985 act, however, had a broader scope, encompassing all aspects covered by the European Economic Community (EEC) European Commission directive 80/181/EEC.

As of 25 April 2012, the current primary legislation in the United Kingdom is the 1985 Act, which was last amended by statutory instrument in 2011.<ref name=1985Act> {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref> Statutory instruments made under the authority of the Act do not amend the Act per se{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, but regulate particular areas covered by the Act.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref>

The Act is currently enforced by the 200 Trading Standards Offices managed by local authorities around the country. Definitions of units of measurements and the technical equipment relating to weights and measures are provided by the National Measurement Office, an agency of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.


Weights and Measures Acts (UK) sections
Intro  Permitted units of measure  England  Great Britain  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Permitted units of measure
<<>>