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The War by Tadeusz Cyprian (1949), a photograph in the collection of the National Museum in Warsaw showing ruins of Poland's capital in the aftermath of World War II

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} War is a state of armed conflict between societies. It is generally characterized by extreme collective aggression, destruction, and usually high mortality. The set of techniques and actions used to conduct war is known as warfare. An absence of war is usually called "peace". Total war is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets, and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant casualties.

While some scholars{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= }} see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,<ref>Šmihula, Daniel (2013): The Use of Force in International Relations, p. 67, ISBN 978-80-224-1341-1.</ref> others argue that it is only a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.<ref name="Sage Publications">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

In 2013 war resulted in 31,000 deaths down from 72,000 deaths in 1990.<ref name=GDB2013>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is the Second World War, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests<ref>*The Cambridge History of China: Alien regimes and border states, 907–1368, 1994, p.622, cited by White
*Matthew White (2011-11-07). The Great Big Book of Horrible Things: The Definitive Chronicle of History's 100 Worst Atrocities.</ref> which was greater than 41 million.<ref>Mongol Conquests</ref> Proportionally speaking, the most destructive war in modern history is the War of the Triple Alliance, which took the lives of over 60% of Paraguay's population, according to Steven Pinker. In 2003, Richard Smalley identified war as the sixth (of ten) biggest problem facing humanity for the next fifty years.<ref>"Top Ten Problems of Humanity for Next 50 Years", Professor R. E. Smalley, Energy & NanoTechnology Conference, Rice University, May 3, 2003.</ref> War usually results in significant deterioration of infrastructure and the ecosystem, a decrease in social spending, famine, large-scale emigration from the war zone, and often the mistreatment of prisoners of war or civilians.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>


War sections
Intro  Etymology  Types  Behaviour and conduct  History  Effects  Aims   Factors in completion  Ongoing conflicts  Limiting and stopping  Theories for motivation  Ethics  See also  References  External links  

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