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Units

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Imperial U.S. liquid U.S. dry
Gill 142 mL 118 mL 138 mL
Pint 568 mL 473 mL 551 mL
Quart 1137 mL 946 mL 1101 mL
Gallon 4546 mL 3785 mL 4405 mL

Any unit of length gives a corresponding unit of volume, namely the volume of a cube whose side has the given length. For example, a cubic centimetre (cm3) would be the volume of a cube whose sides are one centimetre (1 cm) in length.

In the International System of Units (SI), the standard unit of volume is the cubic metre (m3). The metric system also includes the litre (L) as a unit of volume, where one litre is the volume of a 10-centimetre cube. Thus

1 litre = (10 cm)3 = 1000 cubic centimetres = 0.001 cubic metres,

so

1 cubic metre = 1000 litres.

Small amounts of liquid are often measured in millilitres, where

1 millilitre = 0.001 litres = 1 cubic centimetre.

Various other traditional units of volume are also in use, including the cubic inch, the cubic foot, the cubic mile, the teaspoon, the tablespoon, the fluid ounce, the fluid dram, the gill, the pint, the quart, the gallon, the minim, the barrel, the cord, the peck, the bushel, and the hogshead.


Volume sections
Intro  Units   Related terms    Volume in calculus    Volume formulas    Volume formula derivations    Volume in differential geometry    Volume in thermodynamics    See also   References  External links  

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