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Toxicity::Vitamin E

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Toxicity {{#invoke:main|main}} The LD50, or the toxic dose required to kill 50% of group of rats and mice, respectively is 4000 mg of VitaminE E/kg of rat and 4000 mg of Vitamin E/kg of mouse.<ref>Material Safety Data Sheet for Vitamin E, accessdate: September 22, 2015</ref> Comparatively speaking, and at lethal doses, Vitamin E is less toxic than table salt and acetaminophen and it is more toxic than ethanol and Vitamin C. Vitamin E can act as an anticoagulant, increasing the risk of bleeding problems. As a result, many agencies have set a tolerable upper intake levels (UL) at 1,000 mg (1,500 IU) per day.<ref name="GOVe"/> In combination with certain other drugs such as aspirin, hypervitaminosis E can be life-threatening.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} Hypervitaminosis E may also counteract vitamin K, leading to a vitamin K deficiency.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}


Vitamin E sections
Intro  Forms  Functions  Supplementation  Clinical applications  Toxicity  Dietary sources  Recommended daily intake  History  Vitamin E supplementation and cardiovascular disease  Notes  References  Further reading  External links  

Toxicity
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