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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

A right-handed Cartesian coordinate system, illustrating the x (right-left), y (forward-backward) and z (up-down) axes relative to a human being.

The most common relative directions are left, right, forward(s), backward(s), up, and down. No absolute direction corresponds to any of the relative directions. This is a consequence of the translational invariance of the laws of physics: nature, loosely speaking, behaves the same no matter what direction one moves. As demonstrated by the Michelson-Morley null result, there is no absolute inertial frame of reference. There are definite relationships between the relative directions, however. Left and right, forward and backward, and up and down are three pairs of complementary directions, each pair orthogonal to both of the others. Relative directions are also known as egocentric coordinates.<ref name="nytimes">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


Relative direction sections
Intro  Traditions and conventions  Geometry of the natural environment  Nautical terminology  Cultures not using relative directions  [[Relative_direction?section=_{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Left-right_confusion_| {{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Left-right confusion ]]   See also   References  

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Right::relative    Defined::terms    Common::forward    Where::stage    Physics::backward    Human::journal

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

A right-handed Cartesian coordinate system, illustrating the x (right-left), y (forward-backward) and z (up-down) axes relative to a human being.

The most common relative directions are left, right, forward(s), backward(s), up, and down. No absolute direction corresponds to any of the relative directions. This is a consequence of the translational invariance of the laws of physics: nature, loosely speaking, behaves the same no matter what direction one moves. As demonstrated by the Michelson-Morley null result, there is no absolute inertial frame of reference. There are definite relationships between the relative directions, however. Left and right, forward and backward, and up and down are three pairs of complementary directions, each pair orthogonal to both of the others. Relative directions are also known as egocentric coordinates.<ref name="nytimes">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


Relative direction sections
Intro  Traditions and conventions  Geometry of the natural environment  Nautical terminology  Cultures not using relative directions  [[Relative_direction?section=_{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Left-right_confusion_| {{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Left-right confusion ]]   See also   References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Traditions and conventions
<<>>