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="3" style="vertical-align:middle; text-align:center; font-size:115%;"British colony ="3" style="text-align:center; font-size:95%; padding:0.6em 0em 0.6em 0em;"
Map of Upper Canada (orange)


="2" Capital ="width:50%;" Newark 1792–1797 (renamed Niagara 1798, Niagara-on-the-Lake 1970)
York (later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797–1841




="2" Sovereign || - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;" •  ="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" 1791–1820 George III - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;"1820-1830 George IV - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;"1830-1837 William IV - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;"1837–1841 Queen Victoria - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedrow" ="2" Lieutenant-Governor; Executive Council of Upper Canada ="vertical-align:bottom;" See list of Lieutenant-Governors - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedtoprow" ="2" LegislatureParliament of Upper Canada - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;" • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" Upper house Legislative Council - class="mergedbottomrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;" • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" Lower house Legislative Assembly ="3" Area - class="mergedrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" style="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  •  ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" 1836<ref name=openl>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation ="3" Population ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  •  ="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" 1823<ref name=openl/> est. 150,196  - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  •  ="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" 1836<ref name=openl>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation ="2" Currency Halifax pound ="2" Today part of (part of Ontario)
Province of Upper Canada

1791–1841

- class="mergedtoprow" ="3" class="maptable" style="text-align:center"
Flag

Government Constitutional monarchy
Historical era British Era
 •  Constitutional Act of 1791 December 26, 1791
 •  Act of Union 1840 February 10, 1841
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}}</ref>

        258,999 km² (100,000 sq mi)
  - class="mergedbottomrow"
  
  - class="mergedbottomrow"
  
  - class="mergedbottomrow"
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}}</ref> est.

  358,187 
 - class="mergedbottomrow"
 ="2" {{#invoke:String|rep| |5}}Density
   ="white-space:nowrap;" 1.4 /km²  (3.6 /sq mi)

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The Province of Upper Canada (French: province du Haut-Canada{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}) was a part of British Canada established in 1791 by the United Kingdom to govern the central third of the lands in British North America and to accommodate Loyalist refugees of the United States after the American Revolution. The new province remained, for the next fifty years of growth and settlement, the colonial government of the territory.

Upper Canada existed from 26 December 1791 to 10 February 1841 and generally comprised present-day Southern Ontario. The "upper" prefix in the name reflects its geographic position being closer to the headwaters of the Saint Lawrence River than that of Lower Canada (or present-day Quebec) to the northeast.

Upper Canada included all of modern-day Southern Ontario and all those areas of Northern Ontario in the Pays d'en Haut which had formed part of New France, essentially the watersheds of the Ottawa River or Lakes Huron and Superior (excluding any lands within the watershed of Hudson Bay).


Upper Canada sections
Intro  Establishment  Government  Politics  Settlement  Population  Trade, monetary policy and financial institutions  Transportation and communications  US relations  Education  Canada West  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

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