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United States of America
Flag Great Seal
Motto: 
"In God we trust"<ref>36 U.S.C. § 302 National motto</ref><ref>Dept. of Treasury, 2011</ref>
{{safesubst:#invoke:collapsible list|main}}
Anthem: "The Star-Spangled Banner"


{{{1}}}

Projection of North America with the United States in green
The United States and its territories
The United States and its territories
CapitalWashington, D.C.
{{#invoke:Coordinates|coord}}{{#coordinates:38|53|N|77|01|W|type:city||

| |name=

}}
Largest city New York City
{{#invoke:Coordinates|coord}}{{#coordinates:40|43|N|74|00|W|||

| |name=

}}
Official languages None at federal level[a]
National language English[b]
Demonym American
Government Federal presidential constitutional republic
 -  President Barack Obama
 -  Vice President Joe Biden
 -  Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
 -  Chief Justice John Roberts
Legislature Congress
 -  Upper house Senate
 -  Lower house House of Representatives
 -  Declaration July 4, 1776 
 -  Confederation March 1, 1781 
 -  Treaty of Paris September 3, 1783 
 -  Constitution June 21, 1788 
 -  Last polity admitted March 24, 1976 
Area
 -  Total Area 9,857,306 km2<ref name="WF" />[c] (3rd/4th)
3,805,927 sq mi
 -  Water (%) 7.1
 -  Total Land Area 9,158,022 km2
3,535,932 sq mi
Population
 -  2015 estimate 322,014,853<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web

}}</ref> (3rd)
 -  2010 census 309,349,689<ref>PDF.U.S. census department data.</ref> (3rd)
 -  Density 35/km2 (180th)
90.6/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2014 estimate
 -  Total United States of America7.419 trillion<ref name=imf2 /> (2nd)
 -  Per capita $54,629<ref name=imf2 /> (10th)
GDP (nominal) 2014 estimate
 -  Total United States of America7.419 trillion<ref name=imf2>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web

}}</ref> (1st)
 -  Per capita $54,629<ref name=imf2 /> (5th)
Gini (2013)40.8<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web

}}</ref>
medium
HDI (2013)Steady 0.914<ref name="HDI">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web

}}</ref>
very high · 5th
Currency [[{{#property:p38}}]] ($) (USD)
Time zone (UTC−4 to −12, +10, +11)
 -  Summer (DST)  (UTC−4 to −10[d])
Date format MM/DD/YYYY
Drives on the right[e]
Calling code +1
ISO 3166 code US
Internet TLD .us{{#invoke:String|rep| |3}}.gov{{#invoke:String|rep| |3}}.mil{{#invoke:String|rep| |3}}.edu
a. ^ English is the de facto language of American government and the sole language spoken at home by 80 percent of Americans aged five and older. It is the official language of at least 28 states; some sources give higher figures, based on differing definitions of "official".{{{1}}} English and Hawaiian are both official languages in the state of Hawaii, and English and twenty Native American languages are official in Alaska. Cherokee is an official language in some Native-controlled lands of Oklahoma. French is a de facto but nonofficial language in the states of Maine and Louisiana, while New Mexico state law grants Spanish a special status.<ref>New Mexico Code 1–16–7 (1981).</ref><ref>New Mexico Code 14–11–13 (2011).</ref><ref name=C&F>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book

}}</ref>
b. ^ In five U.S. territories, English as well as one or more indigenous languages are official: Spanish in Puerto Rico, Samoan in American Samoa, Chamorro in both Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. Carolinian is also a official language in the Northern Mariana Islands.
c. ^ Whether the United States or China is larger has been disputed. The figure given is from the U.S. Census.<ref name="State and other areas" />
d. ^ See Time in the United States for details about laws governing time zones in the United States.
e. ^ Except the United States Virgin Islands.

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major territories and various possessions.Unknown extension tag "ref"Unknown extension tag "ref" The 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is in the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific. The territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. At 3.8 million square miles (9.842 million km2)<ref name="State and other areas">"State and other areas", U.S. Census Bureau, MAF/TIGER database as of August 2010, excluding the U.S. Minor Outlying Islands. viewed October 22, 2014.</ref> and with over 320 million people, the country is the world's third or fourth-largest by total areaUnknown extension tag "ref" and the third most populous. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries.<ref name="DD">Adams, J.Q.; Strother-Adams, Pearlie (2001). Dealing with Diversity. Chicago: Kendall/Hunt. ISBN 0-7872-8145-X.</ref> The geography and climate of the United States are also extremely diverse, and the country is home to a wide variety of wildlife.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Paleo-Indians migrated from Eurasia to what is now the U.S. mainland at least 15,000 years ago,<ref name=earliest /> with European colonization beginning in the 16th century. The United States emerged from 13 British colonies along the East Coast. Disputes between Great Britain and the colonies led to the American Revolution. On July 4, 1776, as the colonies were fighting Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War, delegates from the 13 colonies unanimously adopted the Declaration of Independence. The war ended in 1783 with recognition of the independence of the United States by the Kingdom of Great Britain, and was the first successful war of independence against a European colonial empire.<ref>Greene, Jack P.; Pole, J.R., eds. (2008). A Companion to the American Revolution. pp. 352–361.
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The country's constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, and ratified by the states in 1788. The first ten amendments, collectively named the Bill of Rights, were ratified in 1791 and designed to guarantee many fundamental civil liberties.

Driven by the doctrine of Manifest Destiny, the United States embarked on a vigorous expansion across North America throughout the 19th century.<ref name="MD2007" /> This involved displacing American Indian tribes, acquiring new territories, and gradually admitting new states, until by 1848 the nation spanned the continent.<ref name="MD2007">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> During the second half of the 19th century, the American Civil War ended legal slavery in the country.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> By the end of that century, the United States extended into the Pacific Ocean,<ref name="AmCentNYT">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> and its economy, driven in large part by the Industrial Revolution, began to soar.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The Spanish–American War and World War I confirmed the country's status as a global military power. The United States emerged from World War II as a global superpower, the first country to develop nuclear weapons, the only country to use them in war, and a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. The end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the United States as the world's sole superpower.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

The United States is a developed country and has the world's largest national economy by nominal and real GDP, benefiting from an abundance of natural resources and high worker productivity.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> While the U.S. economy is considered post-industrial, the country continues to be one of the world's largest manufacturers.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Accounting for 34% of global military spending<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and 23% of world GDP,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> it is the world's foremost military and economic power, a prominent political and cultural force, and a leader in scientific research and technological innovations.<ref>Cohen, 2004: History and the Hyperpower
BBC, April 2008: Country Profile: United States of America
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


United States sections
Intro  Etymology  History  Geography, climate, and environment  Demographics  Government and politics  Law enforcement and crime  Economy  Education  Culture  Infrastructure  Science and technology  Health  Media  See also  Notes  References  Bibliography and further reading  External links  

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Title::united    States::first    Books::american    Https::author    Google::january    October::press

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Protection banner|main}} Unknown extension tag "indicator"{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use mdy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use American English |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

United States of America
Flag Great Seal
Motto: 
"In God we trust"<ref>36 U.S.C. § 302 National motto</ref><ref>Dept. of Treasury, 2011</ref>
{{safesubst:#invoke:collapsible list|main}}
Anthem: "The Star-Spangled Banner"


{{{1}}}

Projection of North America with the United States in green
The United States and its territories
The United States and its territories
CapitalWashington, D.C.
{{#invoke:Coordinates|coord}}{{#coordinates:38|53|N|77|01|W|type:city||

| |name=

}}
Largest city New York City
{{#invoke:Coordinates|coord}}{{#coordinates:40|43|N|74|00|W|||

| |name=

}}
Official languages None at federal level[a]
National language English[b]
Demonym American
Government Federal presidential constitutional republic
 -  President Barack Obama
 -  Vice President Joe Biden
 -  Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
 -  Chief Justice John Roberts
Legislature Congress
 -  Upper house Senate
 -  Lower house House of Representatives
 -  Declaration July 4, 1776 
 -  Confederation March 1, 1781 
 -  Treaty of Paris September 3, 1783 
 -  Constitution June 21, 1788 
 -  Last polity admitted March 24, 1976 
Area
 -  Total Area 9,857,306 km2<ref name="WF" />[c] (3rd/4th)
3,805,927 sq mi
 -  Water (%) 7.1
 -  Total Land Area 9,158,022 km2
3,535,932 sq mi
Population
 -  2015 estimate 322,014,853<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web

}}</ref> (3rd)
 -  2010 census 309,349,689<ref>PDF.U.S. census department data.</ref> (3rd)
 -  Density 35/km2 (180th)
90.6/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2014 estimate
 -  Total $17.419 trillion<ref name=imf2 /> (2nd)
 -  Per capita $54,629<ref name=imf2 /> (10th)
GDP (nominal) 2014 estimate
 -  Total $17.419 trillion<ref name=imf2>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web

}}</ref> (1st)
 -  Per capita $54,629<ref name=imf2 /> (5th)
Gini (2013)40.8<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web

}}</ref>
medium
HDI (2013)Steady 0.914<ref name="HDI">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=web

}}</ref>
very high · 5th
Currency [[{{#property:p38}}]] ($) (USD)
Time zone (UTC−4 to −12, +10, +11)
 -  Summer (DST)  (UTC−4 to −10[d])
Date format MM/DD/YYYY
Drives on the right[e]
Calling code +1
ISO 3166 code US
Internet TLD .us{{#invoke:String|rep| |3}}.gov{{#invoke:String|rep| |3}}.mil{{#invoke:String|rep| |3}}.edu
a. ^ English is the de facto language of American government and the sole language spoken at home by 80 percent of Americans aged five and older. It is the official language of at least 28 states; some sources give higher figures, based on differing definitions of "official".{{{1}}} English and Hawaiian are both official languages in the state of Hawaii, and English and twenty Native American languages are official in Alaska. Cherokee is an official language in some Native-controlled lands of Oklahoma. French is a de facto but nonofficial language in the states of Maine and Louisiana, while New Mexico state law grants Spanish a special status.<ref>New Mexico Code 1–16–7 (1981).</ref><ref>New Mexico Code 14–11–13 (2011).</ref><ref name=C&F>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book

}}</ref>
b. ^ In five U.S. territories, English as well as one or more indigenous languages are official: Spanish in Puerto Rico, Samoan in American Samoa, Chamorro in both Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. Carolinian is also a official language in the Northern Mariana Islands.
c. ^ Whether the United States or China is larger has been disputed. The figure given is from the U.S. Census.<ref name="State and other areas" />
d. ^ See Time in the United States for details about laws governing time zones in the United States.
e. ^ Except the United States Virgin Islands.

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major territories and various possessions.Unknown extension tag "ref"Unknown extension tag "ref" The 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is in the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific. The territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. At 3.8 million square miles (9.842 million km2)<ref name="State and other areas">"State and other areas", U.S. Census Bureau, MAF/TIGER database as of August 2010, excluding the U.S. Minor Outlying Islands. viewed October 22, 2014.</ref> and with over 320 million people, the country is the world's third or fourth-largest by total areaUnknown extension tag "ref" and the third most populous. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries.<ref name="DD">Adams, J.Q.; Strother-Adams, Pearlie (2001). Dealing with Diversity. Chicago: Kendall/Hunt. ISBN 0-7872-8145-X.</ref> The geography and climate of the United States are also extremely diverse, and the country is home to a wide variety of wildlife.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Paleo-Indians migrated from Eurasia to what is now the U.S. mainland at least 15,000 years ago,<ref name=earliest /> with European colonization beginning in the 16th century. The United States emerged from 13 British colonies along the East Coast. Disputes between Great Britain and the colonies led to the American Revolution. On July 4, 1776, as the colonies were fighting Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War, delegates from the 13 colonies unanimously adopted the Declaration of Independence. The war ended in 1783 with recognition of the independence of the United States by the Kingdom of Great Britain, and was the first successful war of independence against a European colonial empire.<ref>Greene, Jack P.; Pole, J.R., eds. (2008). A Companion to the American Revolution. pp. 352–361.
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The country's constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, and ratified by the states in 1788. The first ten amendments, collectively named the Bill of Rights, were ratified in 1791 and designed to guarantee many fundamental civil liberties.

Driven by the doctrine of Manifest Destiny, the United States embarked on a vigorous expansion across North America throughout the 19th century.<ref name="MD2007" /> This involved displacing American Indian tribes, acquiring new territories, and gradually admitting new states, until by 1848 the nation spanned the continent.<ref name="MD2007">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> During the second half of the 19th century, the American Civil War ended legal slavery in the country.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> By the end of that century, the United States extended into the Pacific Ocean,<ref name="AmCentNYT">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> and its economy, driven in large part by the Industrial Revolution, began to soar.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The Spanish–American War and World War I confirmed the country's status as a global military power. The United States emerged from World War II as a global superpower, the first country to develop nuclear weapons, the only country to use them in war, and a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. The end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the United States as the world's sole superpower.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

The United States is a developed country and has the world's largest national economy by nominal and real GDP, benefiting from an abundance of natural resources and high worker productivity.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> While the U.S. economy is considered post-industrial, the country continues to be one of the world's largest manufacturers.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Accounting for 34% of global military spending<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and 23% of world GDP,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> it is the world's foremost military and economic power, a prominent political and cultural force, and a leader in scientific research and technological innovations.<ref>Cohen, 2004: History and the Hyperpower
BBC, April 2008: Country Profile: United States of America
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}
{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


United States sections
Intro  Etymology  History  Geography, climate, and environment  Demographics  Government and politics  Law enforcement and crime  Economy  Education  Culture  Infrastructure  Science and technology  Health  Media  See also  Notes  References  Bibliography and further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Etymology
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