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Prepositions and postpositions, together called adpositions (or broadly, in English, simply prepositions),<ref name="HP602"/> are a class of words that express spatial or temporal relations (in, under, towards, before) or marking various semantic roles (of, for).<ref>Huddleston & Pullum (2002), chapter 7.</ref>

A preposition or postposition typically combines with a noun or pronoun, or more generally a noun phrase, this being called its complement, or sometimes object. A preposition comes before its complement; a postposition comes after its complement. English generally has prepositions rather than postpositions – words such as in, under and of precede their objects, as in in England, under the table, of Jane – although there are a small handful of exceptions including "ago" and "notwithstanding", as in "three days ago" and "financial limitations notwithstanding". Some languages, which use a different word order, have postpositions instead, or have both types. The phrase formed by a preposition or postposition together with its complement is called a prepositional phrase (or postpositional phrase, adpositional phrase, etc.) – such phrases usually play an adverbial role in a sentence.

A less common type of adposition is the circumposition, which consists of two parts that appear on each side of the complement. Other terms sometimes used for particular types of adposition include ambiposition, inposition and interposition. Some linguists use the word preposition in place of adposition regardless of the applicable word order.<ref name="HP602">An example is Huddleston & Pullum (2002) ("CGEL"), whose choice of terms is discussed on p. 602.</ref>


Preposition and postposition sections
Intro  Terminology  Grammatical properties  Classification by position  Stranding  Simple, complex and improper  Different forms of complement  Semantic functions  Overlaps with other categories  See also  References  Bibliography  External links  

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Prepositions and postpositions, together called adpositions (or broadly, in English, simply prepositions),<ref name="HP602"/> are a class of words that express spatial or temporal relations (in, under, towards, before) or marking various semantic roles (of, for).<ref>Huddleston & Pullum (2002), chapter 7.</ref>

A preposition or postposition typically combines with a noun or pronoun, or more generally a noun phrase, this being called its complement, or sometimes object. A preposition comes before its complement; a postposition comes after its complement. English generally has prepositions rather than postpositions – words such as in, under and of precede their objects, as in in England, under the table, of Jane – although there are a small handful of exceptions including "ago" and "notwithstanding", as in "three days ago" and "financial limitations notwithstanding". Some languages, which use a different word order, have postpositions instead, or have both types. The phrase formed by a preposition or postposition together with its complement is called a prepositional phrase (or postpositional phrase, adpositional phrase, etc.) – such phrases usually play an adverbial role in a sentence.

A less common type of adposition is the circumposition, which consists of two parts that appear on each side of the complement. Other terms sometimes used for particular types of adposition include ambiposition, inposition and interposition. Some linguists use the word preposition in place of adposition regardless of the applicable word order.<ref name="HP602">An example is Huddleston & Pullum (2002) ("CGEL"), whose choice of terms is discussed on p. 602.</ref>


Preposition and postposition sections
Intro  Terminology  Grammatical properties  Classification by position  Stranding  Simple, complex and improper  Different forms of complement  Semantic functions  Overlaps with other categories  See also  References  Bibliography  External links  

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