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::State of the Union

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The State of the Union is the address presented by the President of the United States to a joint session of the United States Congress, typically delivered annually. The address not only reports on the condition of the nation but also allows the President to outline his or her legislative agenda (for which they need the cooperation of Congress) and national priorities.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The address fulfills rules in Article II, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, requiring the President to periodically give Congress information on the "state of the union"<ref>Modern quotes of the US constitution usually do not follow its original capitalization of most nouns, and Wikipedia's manual of style says to avoid unnecessary capitalization</ref> and recommend any measures that he or she believes are necessary and expedient. During most of the country's first century, the President primarily only submitted a written report to Congress. With the advent of radio and television, the address is now broadcast live across the country on most networks.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=pressrelease |type=Press release }}</ref>


State of the Union sections
Intro  Background  History  Delivery of the speech  Opposition response  Significance  Local versions  Historic speeches  See also  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use mdy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

The State of the Union is the address presented by the President of the United States to a joint session of the United States Congress, typically delivered annually. The address not only reports on the condition of the nation but also allows the President to outline his or her legislative agenda (for which they need the cooperation of Congress) and national priorities.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The address fulfills rules in Article II, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, requiring the President to periodically give Congress information on the "state of the union"<ref>Modern quotes of the US constitution usually do not follow its original capitalization of most nouns, and Wikipedia's manual of style says to avoid unnecessary capitalization</ref> and recommend any measures that he or she believes are necessary and expedient. During most of the country's first century, the President primarily only submitted a written report to Congress. With the advent of radio and television, the address is now broadcast live across the country on most networks.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=pressrelease |type=Press release }}</ref>


State of the Union sections
Intro  Background  History  Delivery of the speech  Opposition response  Significance  Local versions  Historic speeches  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Background
<<>>