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Member states of the United Nations, all of which are sovereign states, though not all sovereign states are necessarily members

In international law, a sovereign state is a nonphysical juridical entity that is represented by one centralized government that has sovereignty over a geographic area. International law defines sovereign states as having a permanent population, defined territory, one government, and the capacity to enter into relations with other sovereign states.<ref>See the following:

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|CitationClass=book }}</ref> It is also normally understood that a state is neither dependent on nor subject to any other power or state.<ref>See the following:

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The existence or disappearance of a state is a question of fact.<ref name="Lalonde2002">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> While according to the declarative theory of statehood a sovereign state can exist without being recognised by other sovereign states, unrecognised states will often find it hard to exercise full treaty-making powers and engage in diplomatic relations with other sovereign states.


Sovereign state sections
Intro  Emergence of states  Westphalian sovereignty  Recognition  Relationship between state and government  State extinction  Ontological status of the state  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

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