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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} Sensationalism is a type of editorial bias in mass media in which events and topics in news stories and pieces are over-hyped to present biased impressions on events which may cause a manipulation to a story's truth.<ref name="fair">"Issue Area: Sensationalism." Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting. Accessed June 2011.</ref> Sensationalism may include reporting about generally insignificant matters and events that don't influence overall society and biased presentations of newsworthy topics in a trivial or tabloid manner contrary to the standards of professional journalism.<ref name="stephens"/><ref name="thompson" />

Some tactics include being deliberately obtuse,<ref>"Sensationalism." Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Accessed June 2011.</ref> appealing to emotions,<ref name="freedictionary">"Sensationalism." Thefreedictionary.com. Accessed June 2011.</ref> being controversial, intentionally omitting facts and information,<ref name="narrowrange">"Issue Area: Narrow Range of Debate." Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting. Accessed June 2011.</ref> being loud and self-centered and acting to obtain attention.<ref name="freedictionary"/> Trivial information and events are sometimes misrepresented and exaggerated as important or significant, and often includes stories about the actions of individuals and small groups of people,<ref name="fair"/> the content of which is often insignificant and irrelevant relative to the macro-level day-to-day events that occur globally. Furthermore, the content and subject matter typically doesn't affect the lives of the masses<ref name="fair"/> and doesn't affect society, and instead is broadcast and printed to attract viewers and readers.<ref name="fair"/> Examples include press coverage about the Bill Clinton/Monica Lewinsky scandal,<ref name="fair"/><ref>The Epoch of Clinton, So Close Yet So Far Accessed September 2012</ref><ref>Monica Lewinsky back in spotlight with PBS' two-part 'Clinton'. Accessed September 2012</ref> Casey Anthony Trial,<ref name="fair"/><ref>Casey Anthony trial: Media frenzy at new heights Accessed 2012</ref> Tonya Harding's role in the attack of Nancy Kerrigan,<ref name="fair"/><ref>Incredible news: tabloids meet news. (tabloid news sensationalism) Incredible news: tabloids meet news. (tabloid news sensationalism) Accessed September 2012</ref> the Elian Gonzalez affair<ref name="fair"/><ref>Elian Gonzalez and "The Purpose of America": Nation, Family, and the Child-Citizen September 2012</ref> and the O.J. Simpson murder case.<ref name="fair"/><ref>The Five Hardest Lessons from the O.J. Trial Accessed September 2012</ref>


Sensationalism sections
Intro   In mass media    History    In broadcasting    See also    References    External links   

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} Sensationalism is a type of editorial bias in mass media in which events and topics in news stories and pieces are over-hyped to present biased impressions on events which may cause a manipulation to a story's truth.<ref name="fair">"Issue Area: Sensationalism." Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting. Accessed June 2011.</ref> Sensationalism may include reporting about generally insignificant matters and events that don't influence overall society and biased presentations of newsworthy topics in a trivial or tabloid manner contrary to the standards of professional journalism.<ref name="stephens"/><ref name="thompson" />

Some tactics include being deliberately obtuse,<ref>"Sensationalism." Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Accessed June 2011.</ref> appealing to emotions,<ref name="freedictionary">"Sensationalism." Thefreedictionary.com. Accessed June 2011.</ref> being controversial, intentionally omitting facts and information,<ref name="narrowrange">"Issue Area: Narrow Range of Debate." Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting. Accessed June 2011.</ref> being loud and self-centered and acting to obtain attention.<ref name="freedictionary"/> Trivial information and events are sometimes misrepresented and exaggerated as important or significant, and often includes stories about the actions of individuals and small groups of people,<ref name="fair"/> the content of which is often insignificant and irrelevant relative to the macro-level day-to-day events that occur globally. Furthermore, the content and subject matter typically doesn't affect the lives of the masses<ref name="fair"/> and doesn't affect society, and instead is broadcast and printed to attract viewers and readers.<ref name="fair"/> Examples include press coverage about the Bill Clinton/Monica Lewinsky scandal,<ref name="fair"/><ref>The Epoch of Clinton, So Close Yet So Far Accessed September 2012</ref><ref>Monica Lewinsky back in spotlight with PBS' two-part 'Clinton'. Accessed September 2012</ref> Casey Anthony Trial,<ref name="fair"/><ref>Casey Anthony trial: Media frenzy at new heights Accessed 2012</ref> Tonya Harding's role in the attack of Nancy Kerrigan,<ref name="fair"/><ref>Incredible news: tabloids meet news. (tabloid news sensationalism) Incredible news: tabloids meet news. (tabloid news sensationalism) Accessed September 2012</ref> the Elian Gonzalez affair<ref name="fair"/><ref>Elian Gonzalez and "The Purpose of America": Nation, Family, and the Child-Citizen September 2012</ref> and the O.J. Simpson murder case.<ref name="fair"/><ref>The Five Hardest Lessons from the O.J. Trial Accessed September 2012</ref>


Sensationalism sections
Intro   In mass media    History    In broadcasting    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: In mass media
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