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This article is about the field of biology. For the practice of stuffing and mounting animals, see Taxidermy. {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek: τάξις{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} taxis, "arrangement," and -νομία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} -nomia, "method"<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>) is the science of defining groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics and giving names to those groups. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super group of higher rank and thus create a taxonomic hierarchy.<ref name=Judd>Judd, W.S., Campbell, C.S., Kellogg, E.A., Stevens, P.F., Donoghue, M.J. (2007) Taxonomy. In Plant Systematics – A Phylogenetic Approach, Third Edition. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland.</ref><ref name=Simpson>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus is regarded as the father of taxonomy, as he developed a system known as Linnaean classification for categorization of organisms and binomial nomenclature for naming organisms.

With the advent of such fields of study as phylogenetics, cladistics, and systematics, the Linnaean system has progressed to a system of modern biological classification based on the evolutionary relationships between organisms, both living and extinct. An example of a modern classification is the one published in 2009 by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group for all living flowering plant families (the APG III system).<ref name="apgiii">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref>


Taxonomy (biology) sections
Intro  Definition  Alpha and beta taxonomy  Microtaxonomy and macrotaxonomy  History of taxonomy  Modern system of classification  Application  Phenetics  Databases  See also  Notes  References   Bibliography    External links   

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Taxonomy::species    Biology::title    Groups::taxonomy    Linnaeus::first    System::plant    Journal::books

This article is about the field of biology. For the practice of stuffing and mounting animals, see Taxidermy. {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek: τάξις{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} taxis, "arrangement," and -νομία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} -nomia, "method"<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>) is the science of defining groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics and giving names to those groups. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super group of higher rank and thus create a taxonomic hierarchy.<ref name=Judd>Judd, W.S., Campbell, C.S., Kellogg, E.A., Stevens, P.F., Donoghue, M.J. (2007) Taxonomy. In Plant Systematics – A Phylogenetic Approach, Third Edition. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland.</ref><ref name=Simpson>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus is regarded as the father of taxonomy, as he developed a system known as Linnaean classification for categorization of organisms and binomial nomenclature for naming organisms.

With the advent of such fields of study as phylogenetics, cladistics, and systematics, the Linnaean system has progressed to a system of modern biological classification based on the evolutionary relationships between organisms, both living and extinct. An example of a modern classification is the one published in 2009 by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group for all living flowering plant families (the APG III system).<ref name="apgiii">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref>


Taxonomy (biology) sections
Intro  Definition  Alpha and beta taxonomy  Microtaxonomy and macrotaxonomy  History of taxonomy  Modern system of classification  Application  Phenetics  Databases  See also  Notes  References   Bibliography    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definition
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