Actions

Quantity in physical science::Quantity

::concepts

Quantity::number    Which::numbers    Between::relation    Theory::property    Length::quantity    Count::michell

Quantity in physical science Establishing quantitative structure and relationships between different quantities is the cornerstone of modern physical sciences. Physics is fundamentally a quantitative science. Its progress is chiefly achieved due to rendering the abstract qualities of material entities into physical quantities, by postulating that all material bodies marked by quantitative properties or physical dimensions are subject to some measurements and observations. Setting the units of measurement, physics covers such fundamental quantities as space (length, breadth, and depth) and time, mass and force, temperature, energy, and quantum.

A distinction has also been made between intensive quantity and extensive quantity as two types of quantitative property, state or relation. The magnitude of an intensive quantity does not depend on the size, or extent, of the object or system of which the quantity is a property, whereas magnitudes of an extensive quantity are additive for parts of an entity or subsystems. Thus, magnitude does depend on the extent of the entity or system in the case of extensive quantity. Examples of intensive quantities are density and pressure, while examples of extensive quantities are energy, volume and mass.


Quantity sections
Intro  Background  Quantitative structure  Quantity in mathematics  Quantity in physical science  Quantity in logic and semantics  Quantity in natural language  Further examples  References   External links   

Quantity in physical science
PREVIOUS: Quantity in mathematicsNEXT: Quantity in logic and semantics
<<>>