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Quantity in mathematics::Quantity

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Quantity in mathematics {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Confusing |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }} Magnitude and multitude, the two principal types of quantities, are further divided as mathematical and physical. In formal terms, quantities—their ratios, proportions, order and formal relationships of equality and inequality—are studied by mathematics. The essential part of mathematical quantities consists of having a collection of variables, each assuming a set of values. These can be a set of a single quantity, referred to as a scalar when represented by real numbers, or have multiple quantities as do vectors and tensors, two kinds of geometric objects.

The mathematical usage of a quantity can then be varied and so is situationally dependent. Quantities can be used as being infinitesimal, arguments of a function, variables in an expression (independent or dependent), or probabilistic as in random and stochastic quantities. In mathematics, magnitudes and multitudes are also not only two distinct kinds of quantity but furthermore relatable to each other.

Number theory covers the topics of the discrete quantities as numbers: number systems with their kinds and relations. Geometry studies the issues of spatial magnitudes: straight lines, curved lines, surfaces and solids, all with their respective measurements and relationships.


Quantity sections
Intro  Background  Quantitative structure  Quantity in mathematics  Quantity in physical science  Quantity in logic and semantics  Quantity in natural language  Further examples  References   External links   

Quantity in mathematics
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