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Puerto Ricans (Spanish: Puertorriqueños{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}; Taíno: boricua) are the inhabitants or citizens of Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is a multi-ethnic nation, home to people of different ethnic and national backgrounds. As a result, some Puerto Ricans do not treat their nationality as an ethnicity but as a citizenship with various ethnicities and national origins comprising the "Puerto Rican people".

Despite its multi-ethnic composition, the culture held in common by most Puerto Ricans is referred to as mainstream Puerto Rican culture, a Western culture largely derived from the traditions of Western European migrants, beginning with the early Spanish settlers, along with other Europeans arriving later such as the Corsicans Irish, Germans and French, along with a strong West African culture which has been influential.

Puerto Ricans commonly refer to themselves as boricuas. "The majority of Puerto Ricans regard themselves as being of mixed Spanish-European descent. Recent DNA sample studies have concluded that the three largest components of the Puerto Rican genetic profile are in fact indigenous Taíno, European, and African".<ref>Minority Rights Groups International: Puerto Rico Overview: Peoples. World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples. 2005. Retrieved 2 July 2013.</ref> The population of Puerto Ricans and descendants is estimated to be between 8 to 10 million worldwide, with most living within the islands of Puerto Rico and in the United States mainland. Within the United States, Puerto Ricans are present in all states of the Union, and the states with the largest populations of Puerto Ricans relative to the national population of Puerto Ricans in the United States at large are the states of New York, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, with large populations also in Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Illinois, and Texas.<ref name="2010 Census">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>US Census Bureau: Table QT-P10 Hispanic or Latino by Type: 2010 Retrieved 25 March 2012 - select state from drop-down menu</ref>

For 2009,<ref>[1] Archived May 16, 2013 at the Wayback Machine</ref> the American Community Survey estimates give a total of 3,859,026 Puerto Ricans classified as "Native" Puerto Ricans. It also gives a total of 3,644,515 (91.9%) of the population being born in Puerto Rico and 201,310 (5.1%) born in the United States. The total population born outside Puerto Rico is 322,773 (8.1%). Of the 108,262 who were foreign born outside the United States (2.7% of Puerto Ricans), 92.9% were born in Latin America, 3.8% in Europe, 2.7% in Asia, 0.2% in Northern America, and 0.1% in Africa and Oceania each.<ref name="U.S ACS Puerto Rico 2008"/>


Puerto Ricans sections
Intro  Ancestry  Self-Identified Race  Stateside Puerto Ricans  Language  Religion  Boricua  Political and international status  See also  References  Further reading  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Protection banner|main}}

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Puerto Ricans (Spanish: Puertorriqueños{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}; Taíno: boricua) are the inhabitants or citizens of Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is a multi-ethnic nation, home to people of different ethnic and national backgrounds. As a result, some Puerto Ricans do not treat their nationality as an ethnicity but as a citizenship with various ethnicities and national origins comprising the "Puerto Rican people".

Despite its multi-ethnic composition, the culture held in common by most Puerto Ricans is referred to as mainstream Puerto Rican culture, a Western culture largely derived from the traditions of Western European migrants, beginning with the early Spanish settlers, along with other Europeans arriving later such as the Corsicans Irish, Germans and French, along with a strong West African culture which has been influential.

Puerto Ricans commonly refer to themselves as boricuas. "The majority of Puerto Ricans regard themselves as being of mixed Spanish-European descent. Recent DNA sample studies have concluded that the three largest components of the Puerto Rican genetic profile are in fact indigenous Taíno, European, and African".<ref>Minority Rights Groups International: Puerto Rico Overview: Peoples. World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples. 2005. Retrieved 2 July 2013.</ref> The population of Puerto Ricans and descendants is estimated to be between 8 to 10 million worldwide, with most living within the islands of Puerto Rico and in the United States mainland. Within the United States, Puerto Ricans are present in all states of the Union, and the states with the largest populations of Puerto Ricans relative to the national population of Puerto Ricans in the United States at large are the states of New York, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, with large populations also in Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Illinois, and Texas.<ref name="2010 Census">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>US Census Bureau: Table QT-P10 Hispanic or Latino by Type: 2010 Retrieved 25 March 2012 - select state from drop-down menu</ref>

For 2009,<ref>[1] Archived May 16, 2013 at the Wayback Machine</ref> the American Community Survey estimates give a total of 3,859,026 Puerto Ricans classified as "Native" Puerto Ricans. It also gives a total of 3,644,515 (91.9%) of the population being born in Puerto Rico and 201,310 (5.1%) born in the United States. The total population born outside Puerto Rico is 322,773 (8.1%). Of the 108,262 who were foreign born outside the United States (2.7% of Puerto Ricans), 92.9% were born in Latin America, 3.8% in Europe, 2.7% in Asia, 0.2% in Northern America, and 0.1% in Africa and Oceania each.<ref name="U.S ACS Puerto Rico 2008"/>


Puerto Ricans sections
Intro  Ancestry  Self-Identified Race  Stateside Puerto Ricans  Language  Religion  Boricua  Political and international status  See also  References  Further reading  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Ancestry
<<>>