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The modern region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
The historical province of Provence (orange) within the modern region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in southeast France

Provence (French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛⁿsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône River on the west to the Italian border on the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea on the south.<ref>See article on Provence in the French-language Wikipedia.</ref> It largely corresponds with the modern administrative région of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, and includes the départements of Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence and parts of Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse.<ref name="Petit Robert 1988">Le Petit Robert, Dictionnaire Universel des Noms Propres (1988).</ref> The largest city of the region is Marseille.

The Romans made the region into the first Roman province beyond the Alps and called it Provincia Romana, which evolved into the present name. It was ruled by the Counts of Provence from their capital in Aix-en-Provence until 1481, when it became a province of the Kings of France.<ref name="Petit Robert 1988"/> While it has been part of France for more than five hundred years, it still retains a distinct cultural and linguistic identity, particularly in the interior of the region.<ref>Eduouard Baratier (editor), Histoire de la Provence, Editions Privat, Toulouse, 1990, Introduction.</ref>


Provence sections
Intro  Gallery of Provence   History    Extent and geography    Climate    Language and literature    Music    Painters    Film    Parks and gardens in Provence    Cuisine    Wines    Pastis    P\u00e9tanque or boules    Genetics    See also    Sources and references    Bibliography    External links   

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

The modern region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
The historical province of Provence (orange) within the modern region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in southeast France

Provence (French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛⁿsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône River on the west to the Italian border on the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea on the south.<ref>See article on Provence in the French-language Wikipedia.</ref> It largely corresponds with the modern administrative région of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, and includes the départements of Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence and parts of Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse.<ref name="Petit Robert 1988">Le Petit Robert, Dictionnaire Universel des Noms Propres (1988).</ref> The largest city of the region is Marseille.

The Romans made the region into the first Roman province beyond the Alps and called it Provincia Romana, which evolved into the present name. It was ruled by the Counts of Provence from their capital in Aix-en-Provence until 1481, when it became a province of the Kings of France.<ref name="Petit Robert 1988"/> While it has been part of France for more than five hundred years, it still retains a distinct cultural and linguistic identity, particularly in the interior of the region.<ref>Eduouard Baratier (editor), Histoire de la Provence, Editions Privat, Toulouse, 1990, Introduction.</ref>


Provence sections
Intro  Gallery of Provence   History    Extent and geography    Climate    Language and literature    Music    Painters    Film    Parks and gardens in Provence    Cuisine    Wines    Pastis    P\u00e9tanque or boules    Genetics    See also    Sources and references    Bibliography    External links   

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