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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Preterm birth, also known as premature birth, is the birth of a baby at less than 37 weeks gestational age.<ref name=NIH2014Def>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> These babies are known as preemies or premmies.<ref name=NIH2014Def/> Symptoms of preterm labor include uterine contractions which occur more often than every ten minutes or the leaking of fluid from the vagina.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Premature infants are at greater risk for cerebral palsy, delays in development, hearing problems, and problems seeing. These risks are greater the earlier a baby is born.<ref name=NIH2014Def/>

The cause of preterm birth is often not known.<ref name=WHO2014/> Risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, being pregnant with more than one baby, being either obese or underweight, a number of vaginal infections, tobacco smoking, and psychological stress, among others.<ref name=WHO2014/><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> It is recommended that labor not be medically induced before 39 weeks unless required for other medical reasons. The same recommendation applies to cesarean section.<ref name=WHO2014/> Medical reasons for early delivery include preeclampsia.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

In those at risk, the hormone progesterone, if taken during pregnancy, may prevent preterm birth. Evidence does not support the usefulness of bed rest.<ref name=NIH2014Pre>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> It is estimated that at least 75% of preterm infants would survive with appropriate treatment.<ref name=WHO2014/> In women who might deliver between 24 and 34 weeks corticosteroids improve outcomes.<ref name=NIH2013Mg>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> A number of medications including nifedipine may delay delivery so that a mother can be moved to where more medical care is available and the corticosteroids have a greater chance to work.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Once the baby is born care includes keeping the baby warm through skin to skin contact, supporting breastfeeding, treating infections, and supporting breathing.<ref name=WHO2014/>

Preterm birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide.<ref name=NIH2014Def/> About 15 million babies are preterm each year (5% to 18% of all deliveries). In many countries rates of premature births have increased between the 1990s and 2010s.<ref name=WHO2014>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Complications from preterm births resulted in 0.74 million deaths in 2013 down from 1.57 million in 1990.<ref name=GDB2013>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The chance of survival at less than 23 weeks is close to zero, while at 23 weeks it is 15%, 24 weeks 55% and 25 weeks about 80%.<ref name=Clo2012>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> The chances of survival without long term difficulties is less.<ref name=Jar2015>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Preterm birth sections
Intro  Classification   Signs and symptoms    Risk factors   Diagnosis  Prevention  Management  Prognosis  Epidemiology  Society and culture  Ethics   References   External links  

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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Preterm birth, also known as premature birth, is the birth of a baby at less than 37 weeks gestational age.<ref name=NIH2014Def>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> These babies are known as preemies or premmies.<ref name=NIH2014Def/> Symptoms of preterm labor include uterine contractions which occur more often than every ten minutes or the leaking of fluid from the vagina.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Premature infants are at greater risk for cerebral palsy, delays in development, hearing problems, and problems seeing. These risks are greater the earlier a baby is born.<ref name=NIH2014Def/>

The cause of preterm birth is often not known.<ref name=WHO2014/> Risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, being pregnant with more than one baby, being either obese or underweight, a number of vaginal infections, tobacco smoking, and psychological stress, among others.<ref name=WHO2014/><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> It is recommended that labor not be medically induced before 39 weeks unless required for other medical reasons. The same recommendation applies to cesarean section.<ref name=WHO2014/> Medical reasons for early delivery include preeclampsia.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

In those at risk, the hormone progesterone, if taken during pregnancy, may prevent preterm birth. Evidence does not support the usefulness of bed rest.<ref name=NIH2014Pre>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> It is estimated that at least 75% of preterm infants would survive with appropriate treatment.<ref name=WHO2014/> In women who might deliver between 24 and 34 weeks corticosteroids improve outcomes.<ref name=NIH2013Mg>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> A number of medications including nifedipine may delay delivery so that a mother can be moved to where more medical care is available and the corticosteroids have a greater chance to work.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Once the baby is born care includes keeping the baby warm through skin to skin contact, supporting breastfeeding, treating infections, and supporting breathing.<ref name=WHO2014/>

Preterm birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide.<ref name=NIH2014Def/> About 15 million babies are preterm each year (5% to 18% of all deliveries). In many countries rates of premature births have increased between the 1990s and 2010s.<ref name=WHO2014>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Complications from preterm births resulted in 0.74 million deaths in 2013 down from 1.57 million in 1990.<ref name=GDB2013>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The chance of survival at less than 23 weeks is close to zero, while at 23 weeks it is 15%, 24 weeks 55% and 25 weeks about 80%.<ref name=Clo2012>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> The chances of survival without long term difficulties is less.<ref name=Jar2015>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Preterm birth sections
Intro  Classification   Signs and symptoms    Risk factors   Diagnosis  Prevention  Management  Prognosis  Epidemiology  Society and culture  Ethics   References   External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Classification
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