Actions

::The Million Dollar Homepage

::concepts



{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use British English |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Million Dollar Homepage is a website conceived in 2005 by Alex Tew, a student from Wiltshire, England, to raise money for his university education. The home page consists of a million pixels arranged in a 1000 × 1000 pixel grid; the image-based links on it were sold for USPixel advertising per pixel in 10 × 10 blocks. The purchasers of these pixel blocks provided tiny images to be displayed on them, a URL to which the images were linked, and a slogan to be displayed when hovering a cursor over the link. The aim of the website was to sell all of the pixels in the image, thus generating a million dollars for the creator. The Wall Street Journal has commented that the site inspired other websites that sell pixels.<ref name="WSJ" /><ref name="WSJ2" />

Launched on 26 August 2005, the website became an Internet phenomenon. The Alexa ranking of web traffic peaked at around 127; as of 1 December 2013, it is 59,582.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> On 1 January 2006, the final 1,000 pixels were put up for auction on eBay. The auction closed on 11 January with a winning bid of $38,100 that brought the final tally to Pixel advertising,037,100 in gross income.

During the January 2006 auction, the website was subject to a distributed denial-of-service attack and ransom demand, which left it inaccessible to visitors for a week while its security system was upgraded. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and Wiltshire Constabulary investigated the attack and extortion attempt.<ref name="BBC DDoS" /><ref name="msnbc">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


The Million Dollar Homepage sections
Intro   Development    Pixel sales    Media attention    DDoS attack    Similar websites    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Development
<<>>

Title::million    January::first    February::dollar    Homepage::pixels    Website::article    Internet::student

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use British English |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Million Dollar Homepage is a website conceived in 2005 by Alex Tew, a student from Wiltshire, England, to raise money for his university education. The home page consists of a million pixels arranged in a 1000 × 1000 pixel grid; the image-based links on it were sold for US$1 per pixel in 10 × 10 blocks. The purchasers of these pixel blocks provided tiny images to be displayed on them, a URL to which the images were linked, and a slogan to be displayed when hovering a cursor over the link. The aim of the website was to sell all of the pixels in the image, thus generating a million dollars for the creator. The Wall Street Journal has commented that the site inspired other websites that sell pixels.<ref name="WSJ" /><ref name="WSJ2" />

Launched on 26 August 2005, the website became an Internet phenomenon. The Alexa ranking of web traffic peaked at around 127; as of 1 December 2013, it is 59,582.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> On 1 January 2006, the final 1,000 pixels were put up for auction on eBay. The auction closed on 11 January with a winning bid of $38,100 that brought the final tally to $1,037,100 in gross income.

During the January 2006 auction, the website was subject to a distributed denial-of-service attack and ransom demand, which left it inaccessible to visitors for a week while its security system was upgraded. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and Wiltshire Constabulary investigated the attack and extortion attempt.<ref name="BBC DDoS" /><ref name="msnbc">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


The Million Dollar Homepage sections
Intro   Development    Pixel sales    Media attention    DDoS attack    Similar websites    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Development
<<>>