Actions

::Ousia

::concepts

Which::category    Eastern::press    Greek::being    Nicene::creed    Because::clarke    Mystical::itself

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Sidebar |collapsible | class = plainlist | pretitle = | titlestyle = font-size:175%; | title = Aristotelianism | imagestyle = padding:0 0 1.0em; | image = Copy of a lost bronze bust of Aristotle made by Lysippos (4th century BCE) | listtitlestyle = background:none;text-align:center;border-bottom:1px solid #cee0f2; | liststyle = border-bottom:1px solid #cee0f2; | expanded = ideas

| list1name = overview | list1title = Overview | list1 =

| list2name = ideas | list2title = Ideas and interests | list2 =

| list3name = Corpus | list3title = Corpus Aristotelicum | list3style = font-style:italic;

| list3 =

| list4name = people | list4title = {{safesubst:#invoke:list|horizontal}}

| list4 =

| list5name = related | list5title = Related topics

| list5 =

| belowstyle = border:none; | below = Philosophy portal

}}

Ousia ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Greek: οὐσία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}) is analogous to the English participle being and the adjectival ontic used in contemporary philosophy. Ousia is often translated (sometimes incorrectly) to Latin as substantia and essentia, and to English as substance and essence; and (loosely) also as (contextually) the Latin word accident (sumbebekós).<ref>Philosophical Dictionary: Erasmus-Extrinsic</ref><ref>Commentary on Aristotle's Physics</ref>


Ousia sections
Intro  Etymology  Philosophical and scientific use  Theological significance  See also  References  Bibliography  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Etymology
<<>>