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Ngô Đình Diệm (About this sound listen; About this sound listen ; 3 January 1901 – 2 November 1963) was the first president of South Vietnam (1955–1963).<ref>Spencer Tucker Encyclopedia of the Vietnam War: a political, social, and military history — Volume 1 - Page xxi - 1998 "For Vietnamese personal names we have chosen to use the Vietnamese system of family name first, followed by middle name, then given name. Subsequent references are to the given name only. Thus, in the case of Ngô Đình Diệm, Ngô is the family name, Đình the middle name, and Diệm the given name. After the first reference, I refer to him only as Diệm. This follows the common Vietnamese practice of using the first name.. "</ref> In the wake of the French withdrawal from Indochina as a result of the 1954 Geneva Accords, Diệm led the effort to create the Republic of Vietnam. Accruing considerable U.S. support due to his staunch anti-communism, he announced victory after a fraudulent 1955 plebiscite, winning with 98.2 percent of the vote (including 600,000 votes in Saigon, which only had 450,000 eligible voters),<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and began building a right-wing dictatorship in South Vietnam.

A Roman Catholic, Diệm's discriminatory policies toward the Republic's Montagnard natives and the nation's Buddhist majority were met with protests and non-violent resistance, culminating in the self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thích Quảng Đức in 1963.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Amid religious protests, Diệm lost the backing of his US patrons and was assassinated, along with his brother, Ngô Đình Nhu, by Nguyễn Văn Nhung, the aide of ARVN General Dương Văn Minh on 2 November 1963, during a coup d’état that deposed his government.


Ngo Dinh Diem sections
Intro  Family and childhood  Early career  Exile  Consolidation of power  Establishment of the Republic of Vietnam  Presidency  Assassination attempts  Land policy  Government policy towards Buddhists  Buddhist crisis  Coup and assassination  Aftermath  Honors  See also  References  Sources  Further reading  External links  

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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Ngô Đình Diệm (About this sound listen; About this sound listen ; 3 January 1901 – 2 November 1963) was the first president of South Vietnam (1955–1963).<ref>Spencer Tucker Encyclopedia of the Vietnam War: a political, social, and military history — Volume 1 - Page xxi - 1998 "For Vietnamese personal names we have chosen to use the Vietnamese system of family name first, followed by middle name, then given name. Subsequent references are to the given name only. Thus, in the case of Ngô Đình Diệm, Ngô is the family name, Đình the middle name, and Diệm the given name. After the first reference, I refer to him only as Diệm. This follows the common Vietnamese practice of using the first name.. "</ref> In the wake of the French withdrawal from Indochina as a result of the 1954 Geneva Accords, Diệm led the effort to create the Republic of Vietnam. Accruing considerable U.S. support due to his staunch anti-communism, he announced victory after a fraudulent 1955 plebiscite, winning with 98.2 percent of the vote (including 600,000 votes in Saigon, which only had 450,000 eligible voters),<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and began building a right-wing dictatorship in South Vietnam.

A Roman Catholic, Diệm's discriminatory policies toward the Republic's Montagnard natives and the nation's Buddhist majority were met with protests and non-violent resistance, culminating in the self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thích Quảng Đức in 1963.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Amid religious protests, Diệm lost the backing of his US patrons and was assassinated, along with his brother, Ngô Đình Nhu, by Nguyễn Văn Nhung, the aide of ARVN General Dương Văn Minh on 2 November 1963, during a coup d’état that deposed his government.


Ngo Dinh Diem sections
Intro  Family and childhood  Early career  Exile  Consolidation of power  Establishment of the Republic of Vietnam  Presidency  Assassination attempts  Land policy  Government policy towards Buddhists  Buddhist crisis  Coup and assassination  Aftermath  Honors  See also  References  Sources  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Family and childhood
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