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Portrait of "The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster", one of the treaties leading to the Peace of Westphalia, where the concept of the "nation state" was born.

A nation state is a geographical area that can be identified as deriving its political legitimacy from serving as a sovereign nation.<ref>Such a definition is a working one: "All attempts to develop terminological consensus around "nation" resulted in failure", concludes {{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}. Walker Connor, in [{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}] discusses the impressions surrounding the characters of "nation", "(sovereign) state", "nation state", and "nationalism". Connor, who gave the term "ethnonationalism" wide currency, also discusses the tendency to confuse nation and state and the treatment of all states as if nation states. In Globalization and Belonging, Sheila L. Crouche discusses "The Definitional Dilemma" (pp. 85ff). </ref> A state is a political and geopolitical entity, while a nation is a cultural and ethnic one. The term "nation state" implies that the two coincide, but "nation state" formation can take place at different times in different parts of the world.

The concept of a nation state can be compared and contrasted with that of the multinational state, city state,<ref name="Radan2002">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Boll2007">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Elazar1998">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> empire, confederation, and other state formations with which it may overlap. The key distinction is the identification of a people with a polity in the "nation state."


Nation state sections
Intro   History and origins    Before the nation state    Characteristics of the nation state    The nation state in practice    Exceptional cases    Minorities    Irredentism    Future    Historiography    See also    References   

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Nation::state    States::ethnic    Title::national    People::kingdom    Cultural::first    Language::which

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}}

Portrait of "The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster", one of the treaties leading to the Peace of Westphalia, where the concept of the "nation state" was born.

A nation state is a geographical area that can be identified as deriving its political legitimacy from serving as a sovereign nation.<ref>Such a definition is a working one: "All attempts to develop terminological consensus around "nation" resulted in failure", concludes {{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}. Walker Connor, in [{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}] discusses the impressions surrounding the characters of "nation", "(sovereign) state", "nation state", and "nationalism". Connor, who gave the term "ethnonationalism" wide currency, also discusses the tendency to confuse nation and state and the treatment of all states as if nation states. In Globalization and Belonging, Sheila L. Crouche discusses "The Definitional Dilemma" (pp. 85ff). </ref> A state is a political and geopolitical entity, while a nation is a cultural and ethnic one. The term "nation state" implies that the two coincide, but "nation state" formation can take place at different times in different parts of the world.

The concept of a nation state can be compared and contrasted with that of the multinational state, city state,<ref name="Radan2002">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Boll2007">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Elazar1998">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> empire, confederation, and other state formations with which it may overlap. The key distinction is the identification of a people with a polity in the "nation state."


Nation state sections
Intro   History and origins    Before the nation state    Characteristics of the nation state    The nation state in practice    Exceptional cases    Minorities    Irredentism    Future    Historiography    See also    References   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History and origins
<<>>