Actions

::Name

::concepts



{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

A cartouche indicates that the Egyptian hieroglyphs enclosed are a royal name.

A name is a word or term used for identification. Names can identify a class or category of things, or a single thing, either uniquely, or within a given context. A personal name identifies, not necessarily uniquely, a specific individual human. The name of a specific entity is sometimes called a proper name (although that term has a philosophical meaning also) and is, when consisting of only one word, a proper noun. Other nouns are sometimes called "common names" or (obsolete) "general names". A name can be given to a person, place, or thing; for example, parents can give their child a name or scientist can give an element a name.

Caution must be exercised when translating, for there are ways that one language may prefer one type of name over another. A feudal naming habit is used sometimes in other languages: the French sometimes refer to Aristotle as "le Stagirite" from one spelling of his place of birth, and English speakers often refer to Shakespeare as "The Bard", recognizing him as a paragon writer of the language. Also, claims to preference or authority can be refuted: the British did not refer to Louis-Napoleon as Napoleon III during his rule.


Name sections
Intro   Etymology   In religious thought   Names of names  Naming convention  Name used by animals  See also  References   Further reading    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Etymology
<<>>

Names::naming    Names::which    Streets::street    Their::example    Named::given    Follow::language

{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

A cartouche indicates that the Egyptian hieroglyphs enclosed are a royal name.

A name is a word or term used for identification. Names can identify a class or category of things, or a single thing, either uniquely, or within a given context. A personal name identifies, not necessarily uniquely, a specific individual human. The name of a specific entity is sometimes called a proper name (although that term has a philosophical meaning also) and is, when consisting of only one word, a proper noun. Other nouns are sometimes called "common names" or (obsolete) "general names". A name can be given to a person, place, or thing; for example, parents can give their child a name or scientist can give an element a name.

Caution must be exercised when translating, for there are ways that one language may prefer one type of name over another. A feudal naming habit is used sometimes in other languages: the French sometimes refer to Aristotle as "le Stagirite" from one spelling of his place of birth, and English speakers often refer to Shakespeare as "The Bard", recognizing him as a paragon writer of the language. Also, claims to preference or authority can be refuted: the British did not refer to Louis-Napoleon as Napoleon III during his rule.


Name sections
Intro   Etymology   In religious thought   Names of names  Naming convention  Name used by animals  See also  References   Further reading    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Etymology
<<>>