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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

This marker indicating sea level is situated between Jerusalem and the Dead Sea.

Sea level is generally used to refer to mean sea level (MSL), an average level for the surface of one or more of Earth's oceans from which heights such as elevations may be measured. MSL is a type of vertical datum

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{{#invoke:Redirect template|main}}a standardised geodetic reference point

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{{#invoke:Redirect template|main}}that is used, for example, as a chart datum in cartography and marine navigation, or, in aviation, as the standard sea level at which atmospheric pressure is measured in order to calibrate altitude and, consequently, aircraft flight levels. A common and relatively straightforward mean sea-level standard is the midpoint between a mean low and mean high tide at a particular location.<ref>What is "Mean Sea Level"? (Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory).</ref>

Sea levels can be affected by many factors and are known to have varied greatly over geological time scales. The careful measurement of variations in MSL can offer insights into ongoing climate change, and the current rise in sea levels has been widely quoted as proof of ongoing global warming.<ref>Solomon et al., Technical Summary, Section 3.4 Consistency Among Observations in {{#invoke:Footnotes|harvard_citation_no_bracket}}; Hegerl et al., Executive summary, Section 1.3: Consistency of changes in physical and biological systems with warming in {{#invoke:Footnotes|harvard_citation_no_bracket}}.</ref>

The term above sea level generally refers actually to above mean sea level (AMSL). It is commonly used in feet and metres above mean sea level (MAMSL).


Sea level sections
Intro   Measurement    Sea level and dry land   [[Sea_level?section=_{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}_Sea_level_change_| {{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}} Sea level change ]]   Aviation    See also    References    External links   

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Level::datum    Changes::height    Change::pressure    Surface::above    Water::which    Ocean::between

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

This marker indicating sea level is situated between Jerusalem and the Dead Sea.

Sea level is generally used to refer to mean sea level (MSL), an average level for the surface of one or more of Earth's oceans from which heights such as elevations may be measured. MSL is a type of vertical datum

  1. REDIRECT

{{#invoke:Redirect template|main}}a standardised geodetic reference point

  1. REDIRECT

{{#invoke:Redirect template|main}}that is used, for example, as a chart datum in cartography and marine navigation, or, in aviation, as the standard sea level at which atmospheric pressure is measured in order to calibrate altitude and, consequently, aircraft flight levels. A common and relatively straightforward mean sea-level standard is the midpoint between a mean low and mean high tide at a particular location.<ref>What is "Mean Sea Level"? (Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory).</ref>

Sea levels can be affected by many factors and are known to have varied greatly over geological time scales. The careful measurement of variations in MSL can offer insights into ongoing climate change, and the current rise in sea levels has been widely quoted as proof of ongoing global warming.<ref>Solomon et al., Technical Summary, Section 3.4 Consistency Among Observations in {{#invoke:Footnotes|harvard_citation_no_bracket}}; Hegerl et al., Executive summary, Section 1.3: Consistency of changes in physical and biological systems with warming in {{#invoke:Footnotes|harvard_citation_no_bracket}}.</ref>

The term above sea level generally refers actually to above mean sea level (AMSL). It is commonly used in feet and metres above mean sea level (MAMSL).


Sea level sections
Intro   Measurement    Sea level and dry land   [[Sea_level?section=_{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}_Sea_level_change_| {{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}} Sea level change ]]   Aviation    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Measurement
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