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Display titleMS-DOS
Default sort keyMS-DOS
Page length (in bytes)46,026
Page ID21291954
Page content languageEnglish



{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__|$B= {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} }} MS-DOS ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}} EM-es-DOSS; acronym for Microsoft Disk Operating System) is an operating system for x86-based personal computers mostly developed by Microsoft. It was the most commonly used member of the DOS family of operating systems, and was the main operating system for IBM PC compatible personal computers during the 1980s to the mid-1990s, when it was gradually superseded by operating systems offering a graphical user interface (GUI), in various generations of the graphical Microsoft Windows operating system by Microsoft Corporation.

MS-DOS resulted from a request in 1981 by IBM for an operating system to use in its IBM PC range of personal computers.<ref name="A history of Windows">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="digitalresearch.biz">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Microsoft quickly bought the rights to 86-DOS from Seattle Computer Products,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and began work on modifying it to meet IBM's specification. IBM licensed and released it in August 1981 as PC DOS 1.0 for use in their PCs. Although MS-DOS and PC DOS were initially developed in parallel by Microsoft and IBM, in subsequent years the two products went their separate ways.

During its life, several competing products were released for the x86 platform,<ref name="roy">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> and MS-DOS went through eight versions, until development ceased in 2000. Initially MS-DOS was targeted at Intel 8086 processors running on computer hardware using floppy disks to store and access not only the operating system, but application software and user data as well. Progressive version releases delivered support for other mass storage media in ever greater sizes and formats, along with added feature support for newer processors and rapidly evolving computer architectures. Ultimately it was the key product in Microsoft's growth from a programming languages company to a diverse software development firm, providing the company with essential revenue and marketing resources. It was also the underlying basic operating system on which early versions of Windows ran as a GUI. It is a flexible operating system, and consumes negligible installation space.


MS-DOS sections
Intro  History  [[MS-DOS?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Versions|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Versions]]  Competition  Legal issues  Use of undocumented APIs  End of MS-DOS  Windows command-line interface  Legacy compatibility  Related systems  Physical RAM limit  Physical hard disk drive limit  See also  References  External links  

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Page creatorClueBot NG (Talk | contribs)
Date of page creation08:12, 10 October 2015
Latest editorClueBot NG (Talk | contribs)
Date of latest edit08:12, 10 October 2015
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