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Archetypal lovers Romeo and Juliet portrayed by Frank Dicksee

{{#invoke:Side box|main}} Love is a variety of different feelings, states, and attitudes that ranges from interpersonal affection ("I love my mother") to pleasure ("I loved that meal"). It can refer to an emotion of a strong attraction and personal attachment.<ref name="oxford">Oxford Illustrated American Dictionary (1998) + Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary (2000)</ref> It can also be a virtue representing human kindness, compassion, and affection—"the unselfish loyal and benevolent concern for the good of another".<ref>Merriam Webster Dictionary</ref> It may also describe compassionate and affectionate actions towards other humans, one's self or animals.<ref name="Fromm, Erich 1956">Fromm, Erich; The Art of Loving, Harper Perennial (1956), Original English Version, ISBN 978-0-06-095828-2</ref>

Non-Western traditions have also distinguished variants or symbioses of these states.<ref name="Gita">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }} (J. Mascaró, translator)</ref> This diversity of uses and meanings combined with the complexity of the feelings involved makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, compared to other emotional states.

Love in its various forms acts as a major facilitator of interpersonal relationships and, owing to its central psychological importance, is one of the most common themes in the creative arts.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Love may be understood as a function to keep human beings together against menaces and to facilitate the continuation of the species.<ref name="Fisher">Helen Fisher. Why We Love: the nature and chemistry of romantic love. 2004.</ref>


Love sections
Intro  Definitions  Impersonal love  Interpersonal love  Cultural views  Religious views  Political views  Philosophical views  See also  References  Sources  Further reading  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Protection banner|main}}{{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}}

Archetypal lovers Romeo and Juliet portrayed by Frank Dicksee

{{#invoke:Side box|main}} Love is a variety of different feelings, states, and attitudes that ranges from interpersonal affection ("I love my mother") to pleasure ("I loved that meal"). It can refer to an emotion of a strong attraction and personal attachment.<ref name="oxford">Oxford Illustrated American Dictionary (1998) + Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary (2000)</ref> It can also be a virtue representing human kindness, compassion, and affection—"the unselfish loyal and benevolent concern for the good of another".<ref>Merriam Webster Dictionary</ref> It may also describe compassionate and affectionate actions towards other humans, one's self or animals.<ref name="Fromm, Erich 1956">Fromm, Erich; The Art of Loving, Harper Perennial (1956), Original English Version, ISBN 978-0-06-095828-2</ref>

Non-Western traditions have also distinguished variants or symbioses of these states.<ref name="Gita">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }} (J. Mascaró, translator)</ref> This diversity of uses and meanings combined with the complexity of the feelings involved makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, compared to other emotional states.

Love in its various forms acts as a major facilitator of interpersonal relationships and, owing to its central psychological importance, is one of the most common themes in the creative arts.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Love may be understood as a function to keep human beings together against menaces and to facilitate the continuation of the species.<ref name="Fisher">Helen Fisher. Why We Love: the nature and chemistry of romantic love. 2004.</ref>


Love sections
Intro  Definitions  Impersonal love  Interpersonal love  Cultural views  Religious views  Political views  Philosophical views  See also  References  Sources  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definitions
<<>>