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::Long-acting reversible contraception

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Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) are methods of birth control that provide effective contraception for an extended period without requiring user action. They include injections, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal contraceptive implants. They are the most effective reversible methods of contraception because they do not depend on patient compliance. So their 'typical use' failure rates, at less than 1% per year, are about the same as 'perfect use' failure rates.<ref name=pmid21668037>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

In addition to being long-lasting, convenient, and well liked by users, they are very cost effective.<ref name=pmid21668037 /> Typically, LARC users can save thousands of dollars over a five-year period compared to the use of condoms and birth control pills.<ref name=pmid20634208>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Despite their safety and effectiveness LARCs are underutilized: only 15.5% of women worldwide use IUDs, and only 3.4% use subdermal implants.<ref name=pmid20634208 />

Long-acting reversible contraception is recommended for adolescents<ref name=Pediatrics10114 /> to help decrease the teen pregnancy rate.<ref name=pmid22764557>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> LARCs are recommended for women of any age no matter how many times they have given birth.<ref name=pmid19641264>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Women considering using LARCs should obtain contraceptive counseling from reproductive health professionals because those who do are more satisfied with them and use them for longer periods of time.<ref name=pmid20634208 />


Long-acting reversible contraception sections
Intro  Methods  Efficacy  Cost  Promotion  Contraindications, risks and side effects  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Methods
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Journal::methods    Title::volume    Author::pages    Issue::first    Rates::health    Failure::birth

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) are methods of birth control that provide effective contraception for an extended period without requiring user action. They include injections, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal contraceptive implants. They are the most effective reversible methods of contraception because they do not depend on patient compliance. So their 'typical use' failure rates, at less than 1% per year, are about the same as 'perfect use' failure rates.<ref name=pmid21668037>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

In addition to being long-lasting, convenient, and well liked by users, they are very cost effective.<ref name=pmid21668037 /> Typically, LARC users can save thousands of dollars over a five-year period compared to the use of condoms and birth control pills.<ref name=pmid20634208>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Despite their safety and effectiveness LARCs are underutilized: only 15.5% of women worldwide use IUDs, and only 3.4% use subdermal implants.<ref name=pmid20634208 />

Long-acting reversible contraception is recommended for adolescents<ref name=Pediatrics10114 /> to help decrease the teen pregnancy rate.<ref name=pmid22764557>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> LARCs are recommended for women of any age no matter how many times they have given birth.<ref name=pmid19641264>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Women considering using LARCs should obtain contraceptive counseling from reproductive health professionals because those who do are more satisfied with them and use them for longer periods of time.<ref name=pmid20634208 />


Long-acting reversible contraception sections
Intro  Methods  Efficacy  Cost  Promotion  Contraindications, risks and side effects  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Methods
<<>>