Actions

The ontological-phenomenological model for leadership::Leadership

::concepts

First::leader    Journal::leaders    Title::group    Their::theory    Pages::members    Volume::issue

The ontological-phenomenological model for leadership One of the more recent definitions of leadership comes from Werner Erhard, Michael C. Jensen, Steve Zaffron, and Kari Granger who describe leadership as “an exercise in language that results in the realization of a future that wasn’t going to happen anyway, which future fulfills (or contributes to fulfilling) the concerns of the relevant parties…”. This definition ensures that leadership is talking about the future and includes the fundamental concerns of the relevant parties. This differs from relating to the relevant parties as “followers” and calling up an image of a single leader with others following. Rather, a future that fulfills on the fundamental concerns of the relevant parties indicates the future that wasn’t going to happen is not the “idea of the leader”, but rather is what emerges from digging deep to find the underlying concerns of those who are impacted by the leadership.<ref>Forthcoming in "The Handbook for Teaching Leadership," by Werner Erhard, Michael, C. Jensen, & Kari Granger; Scott Snook, Nitin Nohria, Rakesh Khurana (Editors) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1681682</ref>


Leadership sections
Intro  Theories  Styles  Performance  Traits  The ontological-phenomenological model for leadership  Contexts  Historical views   Myths   Action-oriented environments  Critical thought  Executives   See also    References   

The ontological-phenomenological model for leadership
PREVIOUS: TraitsNEXT: Contexts
<<>>