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The Jews (Hebrew: ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]), also known as the Jewish people, are an ethnoreligious group originating from the Israelites or Hebrews of the Ancient Near East. The Jewish people and the religion of Judaism are strongly interrelated. Converts to Judaism have been absorbed into the Jewish people throughout the millennia.

The world Jewish population reached a peak of 16.7 million prior to World War II,<ref name="JVIL2010" /> but approximately 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust. Since then the population has risen again, and as of 2014 was estimated at 13.90 million by the North American Jewish Data Bank,<ref name="JVIL2010">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}, based on {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> or less than 0.2% of the total world population (roughly one in every 514 people).<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> According to this report, about 43% of all Jews reside in Israel (6 million), and 40% in the United States (5.3–6.8 million), with most of the remainder living in Europe (1.41 million) and Canada (0.39 million).<ref name="JVIL2010" /> These numbers include all those who self-identified as Jews in a socio-demographic study or were identified as so by a respondent in the same household.<ref>Jewish Virtual Library. World Jewish Population. "Refers to the Core Jewish Population. The concept of core Jewish population includes all persons who, when asked in a socio-demographic survey, identify themselves as Jews; or who are identified as Jews by a respondent in the same household, and do not have another monotheistic religion." [1]</ref> The exact world Jewish population, however, is difficult to measure. In addition to issues with census methodology, there are halakhic disputes regarding who is a Jew and secular, political, and ancestral identification factors that may affect the figure considerably.<ref name=Pfeffer>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Jews have greatly influenced and contributed to many fields, including ethics,<ref>Sekine, Seizō. A Comparative Study of the Origins of Ethical Thought: Hellenism and Hebraism. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. Print.</ref> medicine,<ref>Roni Caryn Rabin Exhibition Traces the emergence of Jews as medical innovators, The New York Times (May 14, 2012). Accessed August 16, 2015.</ref><ref>Shatzmiller, Joseph. Doctors to Princes and Paupers: Jews, Medicine, and Medieval Society. Berkeley: U of California, 1995. Print.</ref> science and technology, the arts, music, philosophy<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and business,<ref>Medieval Doctrine, Jewish Encyclopedia, 1906</ref><ref>Johnson (1987), pp. 171–173, 283–286</ref> both historically and contemporarily.

Israel is the only country where Jews are a majority of the population. The modern State of Israel was established as a Jewish state and defines itself as such in its Basic Laws. Its Law of Return grants the right of citizenship to any Jew who requests it.<ref>A 1970 amendment to Israel's Law of Return defines "Jew" as "a person who was born of a Jewish mother or has become converted to Judaism and who is not a member of another religion." {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Jews sections
Intro   Name and etymology    Origins    Judaism    Who is a Jew?    Ethnic divisions    Languages    Genetic studies    Demographics    Leadership    Notable individuals    See also    References    Further reading    External links   

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

  1. REDIRECT

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Jews (Hebrew: ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]), also known as the Jewish people, are an ethnoreligious group originating from the Israelites or Hebrews of the Ancient Near East. The Jewish people and the religion of Judaism are strongly interrelated. Converts to Judaism have been absorbed into the Jewish people throughout the millennia.

The world Jewish population reached a peak of 16.7 million prior to World War II,<ref name="JVIL2010" /> but approximately 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust. Since then the population has risen again, and as of 2014 was estimated at 13.90 million by the North American Jewish Data Bank,<ref name="JVIL2010">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}, based on {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> or less than 0.2% of the total world population (roughly one in every 514 people).<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> According to this report, about 43% of all Jews reside in Israel (6 million), and 40% in the United States (5.3–6.8 million), with most of the remainder living in Europe (1.41 million) and Canada (0.39 million).<ref name="JVIL2010" /> These numbers include all those who self-identified as Jews in a socio-demographic study or were identified as so by a respondent in the same household.<ref>Jewish Virtual Library. World Jewish Population. "Refers to the Core Jewish Population. The concept of core Jewish population includes all persons who, when asked in a socio-demographic survey, identify themselves as Jews; or who are identified as Jews by a respondent in the same household, and do not have another monotheistic religion." [1]</ref> The exact world Jewish population, however, is difficult to measure. In addition to issues with census methodology, there are halakhic disputes regarding who is a Jew and secular, political, and ancestral identification factors that may affect the figure considerably.<ref name=Pfeffer>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Jews have greatly influenced and contributed to many fields, including ethics,<ref>Sekine, Seizō. A Comparative Study of the Origins of Ethical Thought: Hellenism and Hebraism. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. Print.</ref> medicine,<ref>Roni Caryn Rabin Exhibition Traces the emergence of Jews as medical innovators, The New York Times (May 14, 2012). Accessed August 16, 2015.</ref><ref>Shatzmiller, Joseph. Doctors to Princes and Paupers: Jews, Medicine, and Medieval Society. Berkeley: U of California, 1995. Print.</ref> science and technology, the arts, music, philosophy<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and business,<ref>Medieval Doctrine, Jewish Encyclopedia, 1906</ref><ref>Johnson (1987), pp. 171–173, 283–286</ref> both historically and contemporarily.

Israel is the only country where Jews are a majority of the population. The modern State of Israel was established as a Jewish state and defines itself as such in its Basic Laws. Its Law of Return grants the right of citizenship to any Jew who requests it.<ref>A 1970 amendment to Israel's Law of Return defines "Jew" as "a person who was born of a Jewish mother or has become converted to Judaism and who is not a member of another religion." {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Jews sections
Intro   Name and etymology    Origins    Judaism    Who is a Jew?    Ethnic divisions    Languages    Genetic studies    Demographics    Leadership    Notable individuals    See also    References    Further reading    External links   

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