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{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} A reflexive pronoun is a pronoun that is preceded or followed by the noun, adjective, adverb or pronoun to which it refers (its antecedent) within the same clause. In generative grammar, a reflexive pronoun is an anaphor that must be bound by its antecedent (see binding). In a general sense, it is a noun phrase that obligatorily gets its meaning from another noun phrase in the sentence.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> Different languages will have different binding domains for reflexive pronouns, according to their structure.

In English, the function of a reflexive pronoun is among the meanings of the words myself, yourself, thyself (archaic), himself (in some dialects, "hisself"), herself, itself, oneself, ourselves, ourself (as majestic plural), yourselves, themself, and themselves (in some dialects, "theirselves"). In the statements "I see him" and "She sees you", the objects are not the same persons as the subjects and non-reflexive pronouns are used. However, when the person being seen is the same as the person who is seeing, the reflexive pronoun is used: "I see myself" or "She sees herself".


Reflexive pronoun sections
Intro  Origins and usage  Non-reflexive usage in English  Reflexive pronouns in languages other than English  See also  References  

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{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} A reflexive pronoun is a pronoun that is preceded or followed by the noun, adjective, adverb or pronoun to which it refers (its antecedent) within the same clause. In generative grammar, a reflexive pronoun is an anaphor that must be bound by its antecedent (see binding). In a general sense, it is a noun phrase that obligatorily gets its meaning from another noun phrase in the sentence.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> Different languages will have different binding domains for reflexive pronouns, according to their structure.

In English, the function of a reflexive pronoun is among the meanings of the words myself, yourself, thyself (archaic), himself (in some dialects, "hisself"), herself, itself, oneself, ourselves, ourself (as majestic plural), yourselves, themself, and themselves (in some dialects, "theirselves"). In the statements "I see him" and "She sees you", the objects are not the same persons as the subjects and non-reflexive pronouns are used. However, when the person being seen is the same as the person who is seeing, the reflexive pronoun is used: "I see myself" or "She sees herself".


Reflexive pronoun sections
Intro  Origins and usage  Non-reflexive usage in English  Reflexive pronouns in languages other than English  See also  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Origins and usage
<<>>