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{{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}} The history of mathematics during the Golden Age of Islam, especially during the 9th and 10th centuries, building on Greek mathematics (Euclid, Archimedes, Apollonius) and Indian mathematics (Aryabhata, Brahmagupta), saw important developments, such as the full development of the decimal place-value system to include decimal fractions, the first systematised study of algebra (named for the work of scholar Al-Kwarizmi), and advances in geometry and trigonometry.<ref>Katz (1993): "A complete history of mathematics of medieval Islam cannot yet be written, since so many of these Arabic manuscripts lie unstudied... Still, the general outline... is known. In particular, Islamic mathematicians fully developed the decimal place-value number system to include decimal fractions, systematised the study of algebra and began to consider the relationship between algebra and geometry, studied and made advances on the major Greek geometrical treatises of Euclid, Archimedes, and Apollonius, and made significant improvements in plane and spherical geometry." Smith (1958) Vol. 1, Chapter VII.4: "In a general way it may be said that the Golden Age of Arabian mathematics was confined largely to the 9th and 10th centuries; that the world owes a great debt to Arab scholars for preserving and transmitting to posterity the classics of Greek mathematics; and that their work was chiefly that of transmission, although they developed considerable originality in algebra and showed some genius in their work in trigonometry."</ref> Arabic works also played an important role in the transmission of mathematics to Europe during the 10th to 12th centuries.<ref>Adolph P. Yushkevich {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }} "The Islamic mathematicians exercised a prolific influence on the development of science in Europe, enriched as much by their own discoveries as those they had inherited by the Greeks, the Indians, the Syrians, the Babylonians, etc."</ref>


Mathematics in medieval Islam sections
Intro   History    Major figures and developments   Gallery  See also   Notes    References   Further reading   External links   

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{{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}} The history of mathematics during the Golden Age of Islam, especially during the 9th and 10th centuries, building on Greek mathematics (Euclid, Archimedes, Apollonius) and Indian mathematics (Aryabhata, Brahmagupta), saw important developments, such as the full development of the decimal place-value system to include decimal fractions, the first systematised study of algebra (named for the work of scholar Al-Kwarizmi), and advances in geometry and trigonometry.<ref>Katz (1993): "A complete history of mathematics of medieval Islam cannot yet be written, since so many of these Arabic manuscripts lie unstudied... Still, the general outline... is known. In particular, Islamic mathematicians fully developed the decimal place-value number system to include decimal fractions, systematised the study of algebra and began to consider the relationship between algebra and geometry, studied and made advances on the major Greek geometrical treatises of Euclid, Archimedes, and Apollonius, and made significant improvements in plane and spherical geometry." Smith (1958) Vol. 1, Chapter VII.4: "In a general way it may be said that the Golden Age of Arabian mathematics was confined largely to the 9th and 10th centuries; that the world owes a great debt to Arab scholars for preserving and transmitting to posterity the classics of Greek mathematics; and that their work was chiefly that of transmission, although they developed considerable originality in algebra and showed some genius in their work in trigonometry."</ref> Arabic works also played an important role in the transmission of mathematics to Europe during the 10th to 12th centuries.<ref>Adolph P. Yushkevich {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }} "The Islamic mathematicians exercised a prolific influence on the development of science in Europe, enriched as much by their own discoveries as those they had inherited by the Greeks, the Indians, the Syrians, the Babylonians, etc."</ref>


Mathematics in medieval Islam sections
Intro   History    Major figures and developments   Gallery  See also   Notes    References   Further reading   External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History
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