Actions

::Watson (computer)

::concepts



{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

File:Watson's avatar.jpg
Watson's avatar, inspired by the IBM "smarter planet" logo<ref>IBM Watson: The Face of Watson on YouTube</ref>

Watson is a question answering computer system capable of answering questions posed in natural language,<ref name=ibm>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> developed in IBM's DeepQA project by a research team led by principal investigator David Ferrucci. Watson was named after IBM's first CEO and industrialist Thomas J. Watson.<ref name="NYT_20110208">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The computer system was specifically developed to answer questions on the quiz show Jeopardy!<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> In 2011, Watson competed on Jeopardy! against former winners Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings.<ref name="NYT_20110208" /><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Watson received the first place prize of IBM Watson million.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref>

Watson had access to 200 million pages of structured and unstructured content consuming four terabytes of disk storage<ref name="contentpages">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref> including the full text of Wikipedia,<ref name="atlantic20110217">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref> but was not connected to the Internet during the game.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref><ref name=nytmag>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> For each clue, Watson's three most probable responses were displayed on the television screen. Watson consistently outperformed its human opponents on the game's signaling device, but had trouble responding to a few categories, notably those having short clues containing only a few words.

In February 2013, IBM announced that Watson software system's first commercial application would be for utilization management decisions in lung cancer treatment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in conjunction with health insurance company WellPoint.<ref name=wellpoint/> IBM Watson's former business chief Manoj Saxena says that 90% of nurses in the field who use Watson now follow its guidance.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Watson

Watson (computer) sections
Intro  Description  Operation  History  Current and future applications  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Description
<<>>

Watson::title    First::jeopardy    Citation::watson's    Jennings::ibm's    Human::computer    Nytmag::response

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

File:Watson's avatar.jpg
Watson's avatar, inspired by the IBM "smarter planet" logo<ref>IBM Watson: The Face of Watson on YouTube</ref>

Watson is a question answering computer system capable of answering questions posed in natural language,<ref name=ibm>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> developed in IBM's DeepQA project by a research team led by principal investigator David Ferrucci. Watson was named after IBM's first CEO and industrialist Thomas J. Watson.<ref name="NYT_20110208">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The computer system was specifically developed to answer questions on the quiz show Jeopardy!<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> In 2011, Watson competed on Jeopardy! against former winners Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings.<ref name="NYT_20110208" /><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Watson received the first place prize of $1 million.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref>

Watson had access to 200 million pages of structured and unstructured content consuming four terabytes of disk storage<ref name="contentpages">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref> including the full text of Wikipedia,<ref name="atlantic20110217">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref> but was not connected to the Internet during the game.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=citation }}</ref><ref name=nytmag>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> For each clue, Watson's three most probable responses were displayed on the television screen. Watson consistently outperformed its human opponents on the game's signaling device, but had trouble responding to a few categories, notably those having short clues containing only a few words.

In February 2013, IBM announced that Watson software system's first commercial application would be for utilization management decisions in lung cancer treatment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in conjunction with health insurance company WellPoint.<ref name=wellpoint/> IBM Watson's former business chief Manoj Saxena says that 90% of nurses in the field who use Watson now follow its guidance.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Watson

Watson (computer) sections
Intro  Description  Operation  History  Current and future applications  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Description
<<>>