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::Human gastrointestinal tract

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Tract::colon    System::stomach    Large::duodenum    Anatomy::small    Title::layer    Author::disease

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}{{safesubst:#invoke:Check for unknown parameters|check|unknown= | Type | type | Name | neuron_name | name | MapPosIGNORE_PARAMETER | MapIGNORE_PARAMETER | TA98IGNORE_PARAMETER | ImageMap | Imagemap | image_map | MapWidth | map_caption | MapCaption | Image | image | image_neuron | Width | image_size | Alt | alt | Caption | caption | caption_neuron | Image2 | image2 | Width2 | image2_size | Alt2 | alt2 | Caption2 | caption2 | caption2_neuron | Latin | Greek | part_of | PartOf | is_part_of | IsPartOf | CarnegieStage | days | Days | system | System | components | Components | location | function | neurotransmitter | morphology | afferents | efferents | Origin | Origins | origin | origins | Insertion | Insertions | insertion | insertions | Articulation | Articulations | articulations | Supplies | DrainsFrom | Drainsfrom | BranchFrom | Branchfrom | Source | source | DrainsTo | Drainsto | BranchTo | Branchto | Blood | blood | artery | Artery | vein | Vein | nerve | Nerve | NerveRoot | lymph | Lymph | Action | action | PhysicalExam | Antagonist | precursor | Precursor | gives_rise_to | GivesRiseTo | From | To | Innervates | FiberType | acronym | Acronym | code | Code | BrainInfoType | BrainInfoNumber | NeuroLex | NeuroLexID | Dorlands | DorlandsID | DorlandsPre | DorlandsSuf | TH | TE | FMA | MeshName | Meshname | MeSHname | MeshYear | MeshNumber | BamsSlug | GraySubject | GrayPage}} The human gastrointestinal tract, or GI tract, or GIT is an organ system responsible for consuming and digesting foodstuffs, absorbing nutrients, and expelling waste.

The tract consists of the stomach and intestines, and is divided into the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts.<ref>"gastrointestinal tract" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary </ref> However, by the broadest definition, the GI tract includes all structures between the mouth and the anus.<ref>|+}} {{#invoke:String|replace|Gastrointestinal+tract|+| }} at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)</ref> On the other hand, the digestive system is a broader term that includes other structures, including the digestive organs and their accessories.<ref>"digestive system" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary </ref> The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment.

The whole digestive tract is about nine metres (30 feet) long.<ref name=KongSingh2008>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

The GI tract releases hormones from enzymes to help regulate the digestive process. These hormones, including gastrin, secretin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin, are mediated through either intracrine or autocrine mechanisms, indicating that the cells releasing these hormones are conserved structures throughout evolution.<ref>Nelson RJ. 2005. Introduction to Behavioral Endocrinology. Sinauer Associates: Massachusetts. p 57.</ref>


Human gastrointestinal tract sections
Intro  Structure  Function  In other animals  Additional images   See also    References    External links   

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