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The term anatomically modern humans<ref>Matthew H. Nitecki, Doris V. Nitecki. Origins of Anatomically Modern Humans. Springer, Jan 31, 1994</ref> (AMH) or anatomically modern Homo sapiens<ref>Major Events in the History of Life. Edited by J. William Schopf. Pg 168.</ref> (AMHS) refers in paleoanthropology to individual members of the species Homo sapiens with an appearance consistent with the range of phenotypes in modern humans.

Anatomically modern humans evolved from archaic Homo sapiens in the Middle Paleolithic, about 200,000 years ago.<ref>Human Evolution: A Neuropsychological Perspective. By John L. Bradshaw. Pg 185</ref> The emergence of anatomically modern human marks the dawn of the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens,<ref>See: Race (human classification) for more on H. s. sapiens</ref> i.e. the subspecies of Homo sapiens that includes all modern humans. The oldest fossil remains of anatomically modern humans are the Omo remains, which date to 195,000 (±5,000) years ago and include two partial skulls as well as arm, leg, foot and pelvis bones.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

Other fossils include the proposed Homo sapiens idaltu from Herto in Ethiopia that are almost 160,000 years old<ref name="White03">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> and remains from Skhul in Israel that are 90,000 years old.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The oldest human remains from which an entire genome has been extracted belongs to a man who lived about 45,000 years ago in Western Siberia.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Anatomically modern human sections
Intro  Nomenclature and anatomy  Evolution  Early modern humans  Modern human behavior  See also  Further reading  References and notes  External links  

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The term anatomically modern humans<ref>Matthew H. Nitecki, Doris V. Nitecki. Origins of Anatomically Modern Humans. Springer, Jan 31, 1994</ref> (AMH) or anatomically modern Homo sapiens<ref>Major Events in the History of Life. Edited by J. William Schopf. Pg 168.</ref> (AMHS) refers in paleoanthropology to individual members of the species Homo sapiens with an appearance consistent with the range of phenotypes in modern humans.

Anatomically modern humans evolved from archaic Homo sapiens in the Middle Paleolithic, about 200,000 years ago.<ref>Human Evolution: A Neuropsychological Perspective. By John L. Bradshaw. Pg 185</ref> The emergence of anatomically modern human marks the dawn of the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens,<ref>See: Race (human classification) for more on H. s. sapiens</ref> i.e. the subspecies of Homo sapiens that includes all modern humans. The oldest fossil remains of anatomically modern humans are the Omo remains, which date to 195,000 (±5,000) years ago and include two partial skulls as well as arm, leg, foot and pelvis bones.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

Other fossils include the proposed Homo sapiens idaltu from Herto in Ethiopia that are almost 160,000 years old<ref name="White03">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> and remains from Skhul in Israel that are 90,000 years old.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The oldest human remains from which an entire genome has been extracted belongs to a man who lived about 45,000 years ago in Western Siberia.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Anatomically modern human sections
Intro  Nomenclature and anatomy  Evolution  Early modern humans  Modern human behavior  See also  Further reading  References and notes  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Nomenclature and anatomy
<<>>