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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

The Hominidae ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}), also known as great apes<ref group=note>"Great ape" is a common name rather than a taxonomic label, and there are differences in usage. It may exclude human beings ("humans and the great apes") or include them ("humans and nonhuman great apes").</ref> or hominids, are a taxonomic family of primates that includes seven extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean and Sumatran orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and bonobo; and Homo, the human.<ref name=MSW3/>

Several revisions in classifying the great apes have caused the use of the term "hominid" to vary over time. Its original meaning referred only to humans (Homo) and their closest relatives. That restrictive meaning has now been largely assumed by the term "hominin", which comprises all members of the human clade after the split from the chimpanzees (Pan). (See below, for a fuller discussion of related and very similar terms, at Terminology.) The current, 21st century, meaning of "hominid" refers to all the great apes including humans. Usage still varies, however, and some scientists and laypersons still use "hominid" in the original restrictive sense; the scholarly literature generally shows the traditional usage until around the turn of the 21st century.

Within the taxon Hominidae, a number of extant and known extinct, that is, fossil, genera are grouped with the humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas in the subfamily Homininae; others with orangutans in the subfamily Ponginae (see classification graphic below). The most recent common ancestor of all Hominidae lived roughly 14 million years ago,<ref name=Hill&Ward1988>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> when the ancestors of the orangutans speciated from the ancestral line of the other three genera.<ref name="dawkins-tale">Dawkins R (2004) The Ancestor's Tale.</ref> Those ancestors of the Hominidae family had already speciated from the Hylobatidae family (the gibbons), perhaps 15 million to 20 million years ago.<ref name="dawkins-tale" /><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Hominidae sections
Intro   History    Physical description    Legal status    Conservation    See also    Notes    References    External links   

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

The Hominidae ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}), also known as great apes<ref group=note>"Great ape" is a common name rather than a taxonomic label, and there are differences in usage. It may exclude human beings ("humans and the great apes") or include them ("humans and nonhuman great apes").</ref> or hominids, are a taxonomic family of primates that includes seven extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean and Sumatran orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and bonobo; and Homo, the human.<ref name=MSW3/>

Several revisions in classifying the great apes have caused the use of the term "hominid" to vary over time. Its original meaning referred only to humans (Homo) and their closest relatives. That restrictive meaning has now been largely assumed by the term "hominin", which comprises all members of the human clade after the split from the chimpanzees (Pan). (See below, for a fuller discussion of related and very similar terms, at Terminology.) The current, 21st century, meaning of "hominid" refers to all the great apes including humans. Usage still varies, however, and some scientists and laypersons still use "hominid" in the original restrictive sense; the scholarly literature generally shows the traditional usage until around the turn of the 21st century.

Within the taxon Hominidae, a number of extant and known extinct, that is, fossil, genera are grouped with the humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas in the subfamily Homininae; others with orangutans in the subfamily Ponginae (see classification graphic below). The most recent common ancestor of all Hominidae lived roughly 14 million years ago,<ref name=Hill&Ward1988>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> when the ancestors of the orangutans speciated from the ancestral line of the other three genera.<ref name="dawkins-tale">Dawkins R (2004) The Ancestor's Tale.</ref> Those ancestors of the Hominidae family had already speciated from the Hylobatidae family (the gibbons), perhaps 15 million to 20 million years ago.<ref name="dawkins-tale" /><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Hominidae sections
Intro   History    Physical description    Legal status    Conservation    See also    Notes    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History
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