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="3" style="text-align:center; font-size:95%; padding:0.6em 0em 0.6em 0em;"
Roman provinces of Hispania


="2" Capital ="width:50%;" BaeticaCorduba
Ulterior - Emerita Augusta
Citerior - Tarraco


="2" Languages Latin, various Paleohispanic languages

="2" Religion Traditional indigenous and Roman religion, followed by Christianity

="2" Emperor || - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;" •  ="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" AD 98 – AD 117 Trajan - class="mergedrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;"AD 117 – AD 138 Hadrian - class="mergedbottomrow" ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  • ||style="padding-left:0;text-align:left;"AD 379 to AD 395 Theodosius I - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - class="mergedbottomrow" - ="2" LegislatureRoman Senate ="3" Population ="width:1.0em; padding:0 0 0 0.6em;"  •  ="padding-left:0;text-align:left;" est. 5,000,000 or more  - class="mergedbottomrow"
Hispania

218 BC–400
 

Government Autocracy
Historical era Classical antiquity
 •  Established 218 BC
 •  Disestablished 400

Hispania ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Latin: [hɪˈspaːnja]) was the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula. Under the Republic, Hispania was divided into two provinces: Hispania Citerior and Hispania Ulterior. During the Principate, Hispania Ulterior was divided into two new provinces, Baetica and Lusitania, while Hispania Citerior was renamed Tarraconensis. Subsequently, the western part of Tarraconensis was split off, first as Hispania Nova, later renamed Callaecia (or Gallaecia, whence modern Galicia). From Diocletian's Tetrarchy (AD 284) onwards, the south of remaining Tarraconensis was again split off as Carthaginensis, and probably then too the Balearic Islands and all the resulting provinces formed one civil diocese under the vicarius for the Hispaniae (that is, the Celtic provinces). The name, Hispania, was also used in the period of Visigothic rule. The modern name España derives from Hispania.


Hispania sections
Intro  Name  Pre-Roman history  Languages  Carthaginian Hispania  Roman Hispania  Germanic Hispania  The end of Hispania  The economy of Hispania  Sources and references  See also  References  External links  

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