Actions

::Heat wave

::concepts

Journal::title    First::weather    Convert::author    Waves::which    Pages::volume    During::issue

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:sidebar|sidebar | class = hlist | pretitle = Part of the nature series | title = Weather

| headingstyle = border-top:#ccc 1px solid; | heading1 = Calendar seasons | content1 =

| heading2 = Tropical seasons | content2 =

| heading3 = Storms | content3 =

| heading4 = Precipitation | content4 =

| heading5 = Topics | content5 =

| belowstyle = border-top:#ccc 1px solid; border-bottom:#ccc 1px solid; | below = Weather portal

}}

A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessively hot weather, which may be accompanied by high humidity, especially in oceanic climate countries. While definitions vary,<ref name="sciencemag">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> a heat wave is measured relative to the usual weather in the area and relative to normal temperatures for the season. Temperatures that people from a hotter climate consider normal can be termed a heat wave in a cooler area if they are outside the normal climate pattern for that area.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

The term is applied both to routine weather variations and to extraordinary spells of heat which may occur only once a century. Severe heat waves have caused catastrophic crop failures, thousands of deaths from hyperthermia, and widespread power outages due to increased use of air conditioning. A heat wave is considered extreme weather, and a danger because heat and sunlight may overheat the human body.


Heat wave sections
Intro   Definitions    Formation    Health effects    See also    Notes    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definitions
<<>>