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Shotgun wedding::Forced marriage

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Shotgun wedding A shotgun wedding is a form of forced marriage occasioned by an unplanned pregnancy. Some religions and cultures consider it a moral imperative to marry in such a situation, based on reasoning that premarital sex or out-of-wedlock births are sinful, not sanctioned by law, or otherwise stigmatized.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Giving birth outside marriage can, in some cultures, trigger extreme reactions from the family or community, including honor killings.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>https://web.archive.org/web/20130501013343/http://www.mrt-rrt.gov.au/CMSPages/GetFile.aspx?guid=91cf943a-3fa6-4fce-afec-4ab2c2a356fd</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

The term "shotgun wedding" is an American colloquialism, though it is also used in other parts of the world.{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} It is based on a hyperbolic scenario in which the pregnant female's father resorts to coercion (such as threatening with a shotgun) to ensure that the male partner who caused the pregnancy goes through with it, sometimes even following the man to the altar to prevent his escape. The use of violent coercion to marry is no longer legal in the United States, although many anecdotal stories and folk songs record instances of such intimidation in the 18th and 19th centuries. Purposes of the wedding include recourse from the male for the act of impregnation and to ensure that the child is raised by both parents as well as to ensure that the woman has material means of support. In some cases, a major objective was the restoring of social honor to the mother.

Shotgun weddings have become less common as the stigma associated with out-of-wedlock births has gradually faded and the number of such births has increased; the increasing availability of birth control and abortion, as well as material support to unwed mothers such as welfare has reduced the perceived need for such measures.


Forced marriage sections
Intro  Historical context  Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery  Istanbul Convention  Causes of forced marriages  Consequences  Violence  Relation to dowry and bride price  Marriage by abduction  Forced marriage as a way of solving disputes  Widow inheritance  In armed conflict  Forced marriage by partner  Escaping a forced marriage  Sharia law  Shotgun wedding  By country  Statistics  See also  References  External links  

Shotgun wedding
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