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Fog, in the form of a cloud, descends upon a High Desert community in the western US, while leaving the mountain exposed.

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Fog is a complex atmospheric phenomenon. It is a visible mass consisting of cloud water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth's surface.<ref name=DefinitionFog>"The international definition of fog consists of a suspended collection of water droplets or ice crystal near the Earth's surface ..." Fog and Boundary Layer Clouds: Fog Visibility and Forecasting. Gultepe, Ismail, ed. Reprint from Pure and Applied Geophysics Vol 164 (2007) No. 6-7. ISBN 978-3-7643-8418-0. p. 1126; see Google Books Accessed 2010-08-01.</ref> Fog can be considered a type of low-lying cloud, and is heavily influenced by nearby bodies of water, topography, wind conditions, and even human activities. In turn, fog has affected many human activities, such as shipping and transport, warfare, and culture.


Fog sections
Intro  Definition  Formation  Visibility effects   Shadows   Sound propagation and acoustic effects  Types  Freezing conditions  Topographical influences  Sea and coastal fog  Record extremes  Biological effects and human uses  Historical and cultural references  Gallery  See also  Notes  References  External links  

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