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Parthenogenesis::Fertilisation

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Parthenogenesis {{#invoke:main|main}} Organisms that normally reproduce sexually can also reproduce via parthenogenesis, wherein an unfertilized female gamete produces viable offspring. These offspring may be clones of the mother, or in some cases genetically differ from her but inherit only part of her DNA. Parthenogenesis occurs in many plants and animals and may be induced in others through a chemical or electrical stimulus to the egg cell. In 2004, Japanese researchers led by Tomohiro Kono succeeded after 457 attempts to merge the ova of two mice by blocking certain proteins that would normally prevent the possibility; the resulting embryo normally developed into a mouse.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Fertilisation sections
Intro  History  Fertilization in plants   Fertilisation in animals   Fertilization in fungi  Fertilization in protists   Fertilisation and genetic recombination   Parthenogenesis  Allogamy and autogamy  Other variants of bisexual reproduction  Benefits of cross-fertilization  See also  References  External links  

Parthenogenesis
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