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Enron Corporation (former New York Stock Exchange ticker symbol ENE) was an American energy, commodities, and services company based in Houston, Texas. Before its bankruptcy on December 2, 2001, Enron employed approximately 20,000 staff and was one of the world's major electricity, natural gas, communications, and pulp and paper companies, with claimed revenues of nearly $111 billion during 2000.<ref>Mergent Online | Enron Company Financials | Annual Income Statement. {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> Fortune named Enron "America's Most Innovative Company" for six consecutive years.

At the end of 2001, it was revealed that its reported financial condition was sustained substantially by an institutionalized, systematic, and creatively planned accounting fraud, known since as the Enron scandal. Enron has since become a well-known example of willful corporate fraud and corruption. The scandal also brought into question the accounting practices and activities of many corporations in the United States and was a factor in the creation of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002. The scandal also affected the greater business world by causing the dissolution of the Arthur Andersen accounting firm.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Arthur Andersen Witnesses

Enron filed for bankruptcy in the Southern District of New York during late 2001 and selected Weil, Gotshal & Manges as its bankruptcy counsel. It ended its bankruptcy during November 2004, pursuant to a court-approved plan of reorganization, after one of the most complex bankruptcy cases in U.S. history. A new board of directors changed the name of Enron to Enron Creditors Recovery Corp., and emphasized reorganizing and liquidating certain operations and assets of the pre-bankruptcy Enron.<ref>[1] Archived December 6, 2011 at the Wayback Machine</ref> On September 7, 2006, Enron sold Prisma Energy International Inc., its last remaining business, to Ashmore Energy International Ltd. (now AEI).<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


Enron sections
Intro  Early history  Former management and corporate governance  Products  EnronOnline  Principal assets  Enron Prize for Distinguished Public Service  2001 Accounting scandals  Insider Trading Scandal  California's deregulation and subsequent energy crisis  See also  References  Bibliography  External links  

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