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{{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} In English grammar, certain verb forms are classified as auxiliary verbs.<ref>Palmer, 1965, p. 19. See also Warner, 1993.</ref> Exact definitions of this term vary; an auxiliary verb is generally conceived as one with little semantic meaning of its own, which modifies the meaning of another verb with which it co-occurs. In English, verbs are often classed as auxiliaries on the basis of certain grammatical properties, particularly as regards their syntax – primarily whether they participate in subject–auxiliary inversion, and can be negated by the simple addition of not after them.

Certain auxiliaries have contracted forms, such as 'd and 'll for had/would and will/shall. There are also many contractions formed from the negations of auxiliary verbs, ending in n't (a reduced form of not). These latter contractions can participate in inversion as a unit (as in Why haven't you done it?, where the uncontracted form would be Why have you not done it?), and thus in a certain sense can be regarded as auxiliary verbs in their own right.

For details about the verbs classed as modal auxiliaries, see English modal verbs.


English auxiliaries and contractions sections
Intro  Auxiliary verbs  Contractions  Contractions and inversion  Notes  References  See also  

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English::verbs    Forms::other    Modal::not''    Which::ain't    Standard::''be''    Subject::certain

{{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} In English grammar, certain verb forms are classified as auxiliary verbs.<ref>Palmer, 1965, p. 19. See also Warner, 1993.</ref> Exact definitions of this term vary; an auxiliary verb is generally conceived as one with little semantic meaning of its own, which modifies the meaning of another verb with which it co-occurs. In English, verbs are often classed as auxiliaries on the basis of certain grammatical properties, particularly as regards their syntax – primarily whether they participate in subject–auxiliary inversion, and can be negated by the simple addition of not after them.

Certain auxiliaries have contracted forms, such as 'd and 'll for had/would and will/shall. There are also many contractions formed from the negations of auxiliary verbs, ending in n't (a reduced form of not). These latter contractions can participate in inversion as a unit (as in Why haven't you done it?, where the uncontracted form would be Why have you not done it?), and thus in a certain sense can be regarded as auxiliary verbs in their own right.

For details about the verbs classed as modal auxiliaries, see English modal verbs.


English auxiliaries and contractions sections
Intro  Auxiliary verbs  Contractions  Contractions and inversion  Notes  References  See also  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Auxiliary verbs
<<>>