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Learning Through Play::Early childhood education

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Learning Through Play Early childhood education often focuses on learning through play, based on the research and philosophy of Jean Piaget, which posits that play meets the physical, intellectual, language, emotional and social needs (PILES) of children. Children's natural curiosity and imagination naturally evoke learning when unfettered. Thus, children learn more efficiently and gain more knowledge through activities such as dramatic play, art, and social games.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Tassoni suggests that "some play opportunities will develop specific individual areas of development, but many will develop several areas."<ref>Tassoni, P. (2000) S/NVQ 3 play work. London: Heinemann Educational.</ref> Thus, It is important that practitioners promote children’s development through play by using various types of play on a daily basis. Key guidelines for creating a play-based learning environment include providing a safe space, correct supervision, and culturally aware, trained teachers who are knowledgeable about the Early Years Foundation.

Davy states that the British Children's Act of 1989 links to play-work as the act works with play workers and sets the standards for the setting such as security, quality and staff ratios.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> Learning through play has been seen regularly in practice as the most versatile way a child can learn. Margaret McMillan (1860-1931) suggested that children should be given free school meals, fruit and milk, and plenty of exercise to keep them physically and emotionally healthy. Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) believed play allows children to talk, socially interact, use their imagination and intellectual skills. Marie Montessori (1870-1952) believed that children learn through movement and their senses and after doing an activity using their senses.

In a more contemporary approach, organizations such as the National Association of the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) promote child-guided learning experiences, individualized learning, and developmentally appropriate learning as tenets of early childhood education.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Piaget provides explanation an for why learning through play is such a crucial aspect of learning as a child. However, due to the advancement of technology the art of play has started to dissolve and has transformed into "playing" through technology. Greenfield, quoted by the author, Stuart Wolpert in the article, "Is Technology Producing a Decline in Critical Thinking and Analysis?", states, "No media is good for everything. If we want to develop a variety of skills, we need a balanced media diet. Each medium has costs and benefits in terms of what skills each develops." Technology is beginning to invade the art of play and a balance needs to be found.<ref>Wolpert, Stuart. "Is Technology Producing a Decline in Critical Thinking and Analysis?" UCLA Newsroon. UCLA, 27 Jan. 2009. Web. 5 Feb. 2015.</ref>


Early childhood education sections
Intro  Context  Learning Through Play   Theories of child development   The practical implications of early childhood education  The Perry Preschool Project   Early childhood education policy in the United States   International agreements   Notable early childhood educators    See also   Notes  External links  

Learning Through Play
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